2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog

Art

The California Lutheran University art curriculum provides a foundation in the studio arts and art history which encourages students to develop their own vision as creative artists and voices for its history and contemporary critique. With an emphasis on individualized attention and creative motivation, faculty members combine a broad range of academic and art disciplines with real-world experiences, philosophies and attitudes.

Interested students have a chance to participate in Cal Lutheran-sponsored travel to a variety of international locations. Each student is also given the option to take art and/or art history classes one or two semesters in a Study Abroad program in countries such as Italy or England. Likewise, Cal Lutheran’s diverse art collections give students access to a variety of art objects from various countries. These collections include the La Boyteaux Collection of New Guinea Art, the Lou Grubb Collection of American Indian Art and Paintings, the Rev. Patty Hundley Photographic Archive and a collection of Philippine Island ethnic artwork.

Art majors may opt for the standard art major curricula or designate their preference with a concentration in design. The design specialty requires an advanced computer graphics course. Sophisticated graphics programs utilizing up-to-date software are available to Cal Lutheran students to increase their creative skills and prepare them for the professional work of design. In addition, other design courses are cross-listed with the Theatre Arts Department, and digital arts classes are available in the Multimedia Department.

The majority of students choosing the design emphasis move into careers associated with advertising agencies, computer graphics, freelance photography, design studios and book design. Students can also prepare for careers in the motion picture and television industries, theater and animation by creating work especially targeted for their desired goals.

Art history students find Cal Lutheran a perfect area to explore museums and architectural works. Nearby are the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Norton Simon Museum, the Pacific-Asia Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art (L.A.), Walt Disney Concert Hall, the Armand Hammer Museum, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and others.

Students interested in a fine arts studio practice are provided a foundation of techniques and interaction with various materials which involve traditional and contemporary studio methods. The ultimate goal is for students to develop their own individual style and body of work while having an awareness of related historical and contemporary art concepts.

All art major seniors are required to take a Capstone course which focuses on the practical and philosophical aspects of being an artist or working in a field related to the arts. This class is designed to assist students in “real world” participation in the arts following graduation. A working knowledge of archival matting/framing, writing an artist statement and preparing a portfolio are included. All of the steps to curate and install an art exhibition are covered, culminating in a collaboratively produced retrospective of the senior art majors’ best work displayed in the Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture.

The Art Department works with the School of Education to serve the needs of students planning careers in teaching. Credential programs, as well as opportunities to practice art instruction, are available. A multi-media major is also available.

Internships at museums, galleries, companies or organizations are encouraged and earn up to four credits.

Bachelor of Arts in Art

42 credits minimum, 24 credits upper division.

Add A235 beginning photography as a requirement, considered a primary skill in the B.A. program (previously, this was only an elective).
ART 111History of Art (Note: either Art 111 OR Art 112 is required.)4
ART 160Drawing3
ART 165Life Drawing3
ART 270Beginning Painting3
ART 280Design3
ART 320Sculpture3
ART 380Digital Art3
ART 410Modern Art4
ART 418Interdisciplinary Arts - Capstone3
ART 440Senior Show1
ART 472Life Painting3
Art Elective Credits (at least 2 Upper Division)4
ART 105American Art4
ART 175Introduction to Watercolor3
ART 275Intermediate Watercolor3
ART 260Intermediate Drawing3
ART 285Imagining Venice: the Semiotics of Of la Serenissima4
ART 330Printmaking3
ART 341Visual Arts in Education3
ART 342Art and Psychology3
ART 350Ceramics I3
ART 351Ceramics II3
ART 370Intermediate Painting3
ART 412Christian Art in the Middle Ages4
ART 414Philosophy of Art4
ART 415History of Ceramics4
ART 416Oceanic Art4
ART 417Pre-Columbian Art4
ART 420Sculpture3
ART 430Printmaking3
ART 435Advanced Photography3
ART 445Comiccomm: Globalism, Zeitgeist & Art4
ART 480Advanced Digital Art3
ART 481Advanced Computer Graphics3
MULT 358Visual Effects, Motion Graphics & Animation4
ART 482
MULT 465Maxon Cinema 4D 3D Animation4
TA 368Scenic Design for Stage and Media4
MULT 462Digital Illustration4
MULT 470High Definition Digital Cinema I for Multimedia4
COMM 208Beginning Cinema Production4
TA 368Scenic Design for Stage and Media4
Total Hours139

Bachelor of Arts with Concentration in Design

44 credits minimum, 26 credits upper division.

ART 112History of Art4
ART 160Drawing3
ART 236Digital Photography3
ART 270Beginning Painting3
ART 320Sculpture3
ART 280Design3
ART 380Digital Art3
ART 385Advertising Art I3
ART 410Modern Art4
ART 418Interdisciplinary Arts - Capstone3
ART 435Advanced Photography3
ART 440Senior Show1
ART 480Advanced Digital Art3
ART 481Advanced Computer Graphics3
Art Elective Credits1
ART 105American Art4
ART 175Introduction to Watercolor3
ART 275Intermediate Watercolor3
ART 341Visual Arts in Education3
ART 350Ceramics I3
ART 351Ceramics II3
ART 370Intermediate Painting3
ART 412Christian Art in the Middle Ages4
ART 330Printmaking3
ART 416Oceanic Art4
ART 417Pre-Columbian Art4
ART 420Sculpture3
ART 430Printmaking3
ART 450Ceramics III3
ART 260Intermediate Drawing3
Art & Psychology
ART 342Art and Psychology3
ART 120Sculpture for Non-Art Majors1
ART 260Intermediate Drawing3
ART 270Beginning Painting3
ART 275Intermediate Watercolor3
ART 341Visual Arts in Education3
ART 350Ceramics I3
ART 351Ceramics II3
ART 370Intermediate Painting3
ART 412Christian Art in the Middle Ages4
ART 330Printmaking3
ART 416Oceanic Art4
ART 417Pre-Columbian Art4
ART 420Sculpture3
ART 430Printmaking3
ART 445Comiccomm: Globalism, Zeitgeist & Art4
ART 450Ceramics III3
ART 472Life Painting3
COMM 208Beginning Cinema Production4
MULT 462Digital Illustration4
MULT 358Visual Effects, Motion Graphics & Animation4
MULT 465Maxon Cinema 4D 3D Animation4
MULT 470High Definition Digital Cinema I for Multimedia4
TA 368Scenic Design for Stage and Media (Advanced)4
TA 167Design and Production for the Stage and Media4
TA 282Selected Topics (Drafting/Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD))1-4
TA 365Makeup Design I for Stage and Media2
TA 342History of Theatre and Drama I4
TA 366Makeup Design II for Stage and Media (Advanced)2
TA 369Costume Design for Stage and Media4
MULT 336Developing Internet Content I4
MULT 463Graphic Design Multimedia Integration4
Total Hours197-200

Minor in Art

18 credits minimum, 9 credits upper division.  Students interested in teaching art should refer to the Chair of the Art Department for information about the art subject matter program. (see Education)

ART 111History of Art4
or ART 112 History of Art
ART 160Drawing3
ART 280Design3
Upper Division Art Elective Credits9
Total Hours19

Minor in Art History

20 credits minimum, (of these, 8 credits must be upper division). 

Required Courses
ART 111History of Art4
or ART 112 History of Art
ART 410Modern Art4
Electives - 3 courses
ART 105American Art4
ART 112History of Art4
or ART 111 History of Art
ART 160Drawing3
ART 412Christian Art in the Middle Ages4

Courses

Lower Division

ART 105. American Art. (4).

This course surveys the history of American art from the first European colonies to World War II. Students consider notions of American identity and nationhood, by examining key works of painting, sculpture, textiles, and architecture, and placing these works in the proper historical, political, social, and cultural contexts. Students gain an understanding of the diverse peoples, traditions, and events that informed American culture and continue to shape notions of nationhood. In this course, art serves as a 'window' into American life, culture, and diversity. What does it mean to be an 'American' today? We begin to answer this question by reflecting upon our past expressions.

ART 111/112. History of Art. (4,4).

111: From prehistoric and ancient civilizations to the Renaissance. 112: From the Renaissance to contemporary.

ART 120. Sculpture for Non-Art Majors. (1).

Designed to take students through several quick, hands-on projects in which they learn about materials, processes and the related history of sculpture.

ART 160. Drawing. (3).

An introduction to the fundamentals of line, shape, form, value and pictorial space and their use in aesthetic expression and the communication of ideas.

ART 165. Life Drawing. (3).

A study of the presentation of the human form through graphic representations, with an emphasis on the structure, form and anatomy of the model. Prerequisite: ART 160.

ART 175. Introduction to Watercolor. (3).

An introduction to watercolor, painting including value and color theory, and the place of watercolor in the art world.

ART 235. Photography. (3).

A fine arts approach to the use of the camera as a creative tool.

ART 236. Digital Photography. (3).

An introduction to digital photography. A fine arts approach to the use of the digital camera, including its potential for creating art, and methods for adjusting and enhancing images on the computer.

ART 260. Intermediate Drawing. (3).

Continuation of the exploration of dry media with an emphasis on 3-dimensional rendering, linear perspective and the portrait. Historical and contemporary masters of drawing will be reviewed. Student portfolio development is stressed.

ART 270. Beginning Painting. (3).

An introduction to various media and techniques of painting. Students experiment with visual elements and their use in the expression and communication of ideas, with emphasis on the creative approach.

ART 275. Intermediate Watercolor. (3).

Continuation of watercolor techniques and picture making principles with an emphasis on 3-dimensional rendering, linear and atmospheric perspective, and the portrait. Historical and contemporary masters of watercolor will be reviewed. Student portfolio development is stressed.

ART 280. Design. (3).

An introductory study in the visual elements and principles of design and unity of expression. Includes creative exploration in two- and three-dimensional composition.

ART 282. Selected Topics. (3).

ART 282C. ST: CORE. (1-4).

Select Topic approved to satisfy a core requirement.

ART 285. Imagining Venice: the Semiotics of Of la Serenissima. (4).

Explore the semiotics of Venice through history, culture, visual communication, and art production. A semester of study prepares you for a two-week trip to Italy with the majority of the time spent in Venice experiencing the modern life of this very interesting city. (Cross-listed with COMM-285).

Upper Division

ART 320/321. Sculpture. (3,3).

Students are introduced to three-dimensional concepts and design through hands-on experience with various materials, such as clay, plaster and stone, using a variety of tools and sculpturing techniques. Course includes study and critical analysis of major sculptors.

ART 330/331. Printmaking. (3,3).

An introduction to various methods of intaglio and relief processes in fine printmaking. Pictorial concern and technique are stressed. Prerequisite: ART 160 or consent of instructor.

ART 341. Visual Arts in Education. (3).

A study of the visual arts in education. Theories and philosophies of art and its objectives in the classroom with correlated studio activities and creative experiences that explore various media and appropriate techniques. Both elementary and secondary school curricula in art are included.

ART 342. Art and Psychology. (3).

This course is offered in the Art and Psychology departments for those students who are interested in the synergy between art and psychology. It satisfies the CORE 21 Participatory Art requirement. It is especially relevant for students with majors in art or psychology or both who are interested in an MFT/ATR (registered art therapist) graduate program. For all others, the course provides an overview of art history, design, production and aesthetics with an emphasis on psychological theories and current neuroscience research. Child development and family systems are addressed in relation to therapeutic uses of art. Visual thinking and creativity are explored and utilized in the production of self-expressive art works.

ART 350. Ceramics I. (3).

An introduction to ceramics that emphasizes development of technique in wheel throwing and includes basic clay and glaze technology and the application of glazes. Students progress at their own speed with specific instruction given toward their individual development.

ART 351. Ceramics II. (3).

Stress is placed on wheel throwing, including the making of varied forms: covered ware, sculpted and decorated pieces plus added slab and coil work. Students are allowed an individual creative approach to further their development in form and surface decoration. Includes advanced technology in higher firing clays and glazes. Prerequisite: ART 350 Ceramics I or equivalent experience and/or consent of instructor.

ART 368. Stage Lighting and Scenic Design. (4).

Presents problems in scenic design, painting, perspective and execution of models and working drawings. Also the study of theatre lighting as an art form with an emphasis on design concepts. The theories of light, color, instruments and control are interpreted in relation to performer and audience.

ART 369. Theatrical Costume and Makeup Design. (4).

A practical study of costumes for the stage. The course examines the history of clothing design, color theory, rendering techniques and design process from concept to execution. Students also explore the concepts of theatrical makeup and design through lecture and practice. (cross-listed with TA 369).

ART 370/371. Intermediate Painting. (3,3).

Introduces the creative use of color based on an understanding of visual structural elements. Prerequisite: ART 270.

ART 380. Digital Art. (3).

This course serves as an introduction to digital art as a medium for artistic expression, as well as to the technical and theoretical aspects of the emerging field of digital fine art.

ART 385. Advertising Art I. (3).

In ART 385, Students learn the design techniques, employ visual strategies and find creative solutions to produce commercial imaging. Students undergo intensive and in-depth experience utilizing Adobe Photoshop, major applications of this course. Students are introduced to, and gain "fluency" with, numerous creative tools, and all the aesthetic possibilities implied. Students undergo a series of creative, visual challenges grounded in basic design principles, to help build, and then master, the multiple skills needed to produce a variety of advertising materials including (but not limited to) page layouts, logos, magazine spreads, CD covers, pamphlets, books, business cards, and letterheads. For anyone wishing to develop the basic skill set necessary to compete in the advertising industry -- this course is essential. No pre-requisite.

ART 410. Modern Art. (4).

The study of art in relationship to contemporary living: its contribution to the environment, its influence and personalities, and its role in our democratic culture. Prerequisite: ART 112.

ART 411. Early Christian Art. (4).

Investigates the first thousand years of Christian art, which represent a transition between Greco-Roman, Jewish and Byzantine monuments. The origins of style and subjects and their transformation into Christian vehicles of great sophistication are treated from many viewpoints - theological, literary, liturgical, iconographic, perceptual and stylistic. Prerequisite: REL 100.

ART 412. Christian Art in the Middle Ages. (4).

Students survey the religious art of the Middle Ages - primarily Christian, but also some early Jewish and Islamic developments - identifying significant works of architecture, sculpture, and painting, while exploring Christian concepts and beliefs, liturgy and worship. Students consider art in relation to cultural needs, examining works in historical, religious social, economic, and political contexts. Students become familiar with visual forms, styles, narratives, and symbols of Christian art, as well as with broader, unifying themes shared by different cultures. The course content covers twelve centuries and geographically spans the Western edges of Europe to the Middle East. We also pay attention to instances of cultural exchange (the circulation of ideas, art forms, and artists through Europe and the Middle East). (cross-listed with REL 412).

ART 414. Philosophy of Art. (4).

The study of the aesthetic experience and the work of art. Includes various theories and their expression, function and criticism. (cross-listed with PHIL 414).

ART 415. History of Ceramics. (4).

A historical approach to the study of ceramics from ancient civilizations to the present, with emphasis on contemporary European and American works. Laboratory research included. Prerequisites: ART 111, ART 112.

ART 416. Oceanic Art. (4).

A historic and stylistic study of the art of the South Seas including Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Indonesia and the early tribal art of Australia. Prerequisite: ART 111 or consent of instructor.

ART 417. Pre-Columbian Art. (4).

A historic and stylistic study of the early art of Mexico, Central America and selected areas of South America. Includes a cultural examination of the objects produced by the Olmecs, Mayas, Toltecs, Mixtecs, Tarascans, Zapotecs, Aztecs and the Incas. Prerequisite: ART 111 or consent of instructor.

ART 418. Interdisciplinary Arts - Capstone. (3).

For all art major seniors, this course focuses on the practical, philosophical, and personal aspects of being an artist or working in a field related to the arts. Useful knowledge such as archival matting/framing, packing, mailing, and documenting artwork will be covered. Students will write an artist statement, crucial when applying for graduate school or accompanying your portfolio in job searches, grant and exhibit proposals, or publishing your work on-line, etc. Emphasis on pre-preparation for the senior art exhibit (scheduled spring semester) including gallery layout design, art announcement design, exhibit posters, mailing lists, etc. - special attention to gathering a strong portfolio of individual work, especially a body of artwork connected by theme, technique, subject, or concept.

ART 420. Sculpture. (3).

Advanced exploration of sculpture as reflected in the human figure, from basic skeletal structure to finished form. Use of plaster body casts and other sculptural techniques reinforce hands-on learning. Course includes study and critical analysis of major sculptors' work on the human form. Prerequisite: ART 321.

ART 430. Printmaking. (3).

Experimental techniques in fine printmaking with an introduction to color. Prerequisite: ART 331 or consent of instructor.

ART 435. Advanced Photography. (3).

Advanced techniques in photography as a creative medium and personal expression.

ART 440. Senior Show. (1).

This one unit course is required for senior level art majors. It prepares students for, and guides them through, a senior art exhibition. Together, classmates plan, design, implement and install this exhibition. Prerequisites: Capstone ART 418 and art majors only.

ART 445. Comiccomm: Globalism, Zeitgeist & Art. (4).

ComicComm: Globalism, Zeitgeist and the Art of Visual Communication covers the development of comic books/graphic novels from the earliest forms of sequential art through 19th century European, Japanese and Asain comics. The course then concentrates on 20th-21st century comics, bandes dessinees, and manga. The coures looks at the ways in which comics embody or challenge the ideologies of the culture in which they originate and how they respond to real-world controversies and disasters. It tracks cultural hybridism in comic art, the effects of participatory fan culture on the industry and issues of race, religion and philosophy as addressed by genre. Students write and illustrate their own comics: mastering the visual language of comics and manga; drawing figures and settings; and framing action and narrative in sequential format. Students' work may be fictional, biographical or documentary. The work is drawn and manipulated on iPads provided by the Library.

ART 450. Ceramics III. (3).

Further emphasis on individual development of the ceramist, including hands-on involvement in developing clay bodies and empirical glaze formulations and an introduction to kiln firing. Prerequisites: ART 351 - Ceramics II, or equivalent and consent of instructor. Recommended: ART 160 and/or ART 280.

ART 472. Life Painting. (3).

Painting from the figure in the environment, with emphasis on individual expression. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ART 480. Advanced Digital Art. (3).

This course explores a variety of applications and third party software filters to increase artistic expression in the field of digital fine art. Students explore special effects and digital engraving, including drypoint, mezzotint and cross-hatching. Prerequisite: ART 380.

ART 481. Advanced Computer Graphics. (3).

Includes illustration and advertisement design, sequential image-making and further exploration into computer graphics as a tool for creativity and finished product. Field studies examine client-studio relationships and directed studies of workshops and studios. Prerequisite: ART 380.

ART 482C. ST: (FOR CORE). (1-4).

Select Topic approved to satisfy core requirement.

ART 485. Travel Seminar. (1-4).

ART 490. Independent Study. (1-4).

ART 492. Internship. (1-4).

ART 496. Directed Research. (1-3).

Faculty

Associate professor

Michael Pearce

Professor

Larkin Higgins

Chair

Christine Sellin

Instructor

Barry Burns

Lecturer

Terry Spehar-Fahey

Assistant professor

Brian Stethem