2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog

Spanish

The goals of our Spanish program at Cal Lutheran are proficiency in the language and a high degree of familiarity with Hispanic literature and culture. To achieve these goals, we offer a wide variety of courses  that use the Spanish language through literature, linguistics, and culture.

Many of our Spanish majors and minors go into teaching, some into private industry and  others into  graduate school. Our program caters to the needs of these students by preparing them for an increasingly pluralistic and globally oriented society and a competitive career world. To that end and because language and literature are inseparable from a cultural context, our program has a strong cultural orientation. In all of our courses, we strive to develop  an understanding of as many aspects of Hispanic culture and civilization as possible . We also place a strong emphasis on developing students’ critical thinking skills in all our courses and many are conducted in Spanish in order to develop students’ proficiency in the language.

Spanish faculty use interactive lectures, group work, engaging cultural activities, such as  video/film presentations, computer-aided presentations and exercises, to give students a well-rounded learning experience.

In addition, students have the opportunity to participate in a variety of cultural activities on campus, such as the Día de los Muertos and Las Posadas celebrations in the fall, as well as the International Film Festival.  Spanish majors can also  become members of the Spanish honor society, , Sigma Delta Pi, or the National Collegiate Foreign Language Honor Society, Alpha Mu Gamma,  and participate in LASO, the Latin American Students Organization.

We strongly encourage Spanish majors and minors to study abroad. The Spanish Department sponsors a program in Guanajuato, Mexico, which provides students with an excellent opportunity to polish their language skills through immersion in the culture. Other opportunities to spend a semester or junior year abroad at any one of a variety of universities in Spain and Latin America are available through the  Center for Global Engagement.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish:

32 credits minimum, 32 credits upper division

SPAN 301Conversation and Composition4
SPAN 315Spanish Literature and Society4
SPAN 325Spanish American Literature and Society4
SPAN 401Applied Linguistics and Grammar4
SPAN 405Latin-American Culture and Civilization (Capstone)4
One Spanish 400-level course4
Two Spanish upper division electives8
Total Hours32

At the discretion of the department, a relevant course in another discipline, such as POLS 443 , may be substituted for the upper division elective. In addition, an oral proficiency exam is required before graduation.

Minor in Spanish

12 credits minimum, 12 credits upper division taught in Spanish

SPAN 301Conversation and Composition4
SPAN 401Applied Linguistics and Grammar4
Any upper division literature, film or culture course4
Total Hours12

Students interested in teaching Spanish should refer to the Chair of the Spanish Department for information about the Spanish subject matter program. (See Education)

Courses

Lower Division

SPAN 101/102. Elementary Spanish. (4,4).

A beginning study of the language. Introduces students to the essentials of grammar through the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing within a communicative cultural context. Prerequisite: SPAN 101: 0-2 years of high school Spanish; SPAN 102: SPAN 101 or 3-4 years of high school Spanish.

SPAN 201/202. Intermediate Spanish. (4,4).

Continuing development of the four communicative skills. Emphasis on vocabulary building and the use of Spanish in practical situations. Includes cultural and literary readings and a grammar review. Prepares students to move into advanced conversation and composition. Prerequisites:SPAN 102 or equivalent or satisfactory score on proficiency exam.

SPAN 203. Spanish for the Health Professions. (4).

This course will concentrate on introducing students to a more specialized vocabulary linked to the different health professions and it will build awareness of the many cultural and health topics specific to the Hispanic population. Spanish terminology that is used in general medicine, exercise/nutritional coaching, psychological and psychiatric counseling, and social services for patients will be taught throughout the course. The student will learn terminology, proper grammatical structures and culturally appropriate manners of speaking within authentic contexts in order to be understood by Spanish-speaking patients and their families. This course is a speaking intensive course as the course places an emphasis on students' ability to orally articulate healthcare topics in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish, or equivalent.

SPAN 250. Spanish Heritage in the U.S.. (4).

SPAN 250 is the second section of a sequence of two courses (SPAN 201 or SPAN 203) covering the second year of college-level Spanish, it continues the development of the four communicative skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course prepares students to move into the advanced conversation and composition course, by using cultural and literary readings and videos, as well as grammar reviews. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and the use of Spanish to express ideas and opinions on the Latinx community in the United States. In addition, this course examines the political, historical, social, economic, and cultural realities of the Latinx community in the U.S. Pre-requisites: SPAN 201, or SPAN 203, or equivalent, or instructor approval.

SPAN 251. Language & Legacy in the U.S.. (4).

SPAN 251 is the second section of a sequence of two courses (SPAN 201 or SPAN 203) covering the second year of college-level Spanish, it continues the development of the four communicative skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course prepares students to move into the advanced conversation and composition course, by using cultural and literary readings and videos, as well as grammar reviews. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and the use of Spanish to express ideas and opinions on the Latinx community in the United States. In addition, this course examines the political, historical, social, economic, and cultural realities of the Latinx community in the U.S.

SPAN 282. Selected Topic. (4).

SPAN 282C. St: Selected Topic (core). (1-4).

Selected Topic approved for core requirement.

SPAN 285. Barcelona Through the Looking Glass. (4).

The major purposes of this course are (1)To understand the literary elements of detective fiction as a genre and its evolution (2) To identify and analyze detective fiction produced in Barcelona and how the genre relates to the city space and its architecture. (3) To understand the influence of the city of Barcelona on some of the major literary, pictorial and architectural works of the 20th century. (4) To explore the city of Barcelona through and make connections between two seemingly different disciplines. (5).

Upper Division

SPAN 301. Conversation and Composition. (4).

Intended to further the student's conversational ability, with emphasis on speaking and writing grammatically correct Spanish. Increased understanding of the Hispanic world through reading and discussion. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. (.

SPAN 305. Introduction to Literature in Spanish. (4).

This course introduces students to the study of literature in Spanish through the reading of short literary texts. Students study literary terminology and methods of analysis and practice the analysis and discussion of literature in Spanish. Texts are selected from across literary periods from Spanish and Spanish-American authors. Conducted in Spanish. Pre-requisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 315. Spanish Literature and Society. (4).

Designed to familiarize students with major authors of Spanish literature from its beginning to present times. A study of selections viewed in their cultural and historical contexts will highlight the extent to which these authors were influenced by the ideology of their times and how their writings, in turn, relate to contemporary thought. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 325. Spanish American Literature and Society. (4).

Designed to familiarize students with major authors of Spanish American literature from its beginning to present times. A study of selections viewed in their cultural and historical contexts will highlight the extent to which these authors were influenced by the ideology of their times and how their writings, in turn, relate to contemporary thought. Conducted in Spanish. Pre-requisite: Spanish 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 350. Race and Ethnicity in Latin America. (4).

This course explores discourses surrounding race and ethnicity in Latin America from the colonial period to modern day. Students will unpack ideologies that center national identity and language as a means to obscure deeply embedded racial hierarchies. The course will analyze how a variety of countries have developed and deployed their own unique set of social tools to shape how race intersects with ethnicity, indigeneity, hybridity, and purity at different historical junctures. Particular attention will be paid to the tension between celebrating mixed racial heritage-an important political project at specific historical moments-and Eurocentric values that favor whiteness and "purity." Prerequisites: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 361. Contemporary Chicano Literature. (4).

Intended as a basic exploration of the literature of the Chicano people. This representative synthesis covers the principal genres of poetry, theatre, the novel, the short story and the essay. A historical framework establishes the different periods of Chicano creativity from its origins through the civil rights movement and to contemporary times. Note: This class is offered in English and may not be taken for the Spanish minor. (cross-listed with ENGL 361).

SPAN 380. Introduction to Translation. (4).

This course is an intensive study of advanced Spanish grammar in the context of translation from English into Spanish and Spanish into English. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of translation theory and will put them into practice by analyzing and translating humor, literary excerpts, journalistic pieces, and documents focused on healthcare, media, technology, law, marketing, and education for example.  The course will present opportunities to critically discuss and reflect on the specific tasks translators perform while analyzing fundamental differences in writing style, grammar structures, and culturally specific themes in Spanish and English. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 401. Applied Linguistics and Grammar. (4).

This course provides students with phonetic, phonological, morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language in its synchronic and diachronic contexts. Includes grammar, reading and writing and has a lecture and discussion format. Conducted in Spanish. Pre-requisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 403. Spanish for Business. (UG).

Spanish for Business is an advanced Spanish language course, that engages students in the examination of cultures of Latin America. The emphasis is on understanding perspectives of Spanish-speaking Latin American cultures as well as developing communication skills for business purposes. Students receive a foundation in the Spanish language and multicultural awareness of diverse communities within Latin America's Spanish-speaking business world. This class is recommended for students planning a career in business-related fields including hotel management. This course fulfills the foreign language requirement. Prerequisites.

SPAN 405. Latin-American Culture and Civilization. (4).

Intended to deepen student's knowledge of the development of the institutions of the Spanish-American peoples, and to improve their conversational ability. Includes lectures oral participation and oral and written reports. Conducted in Spanish (offered in spring) Pre-requisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 461. Mexican Literature. (4).

Critical study of selected representative readings from pre-Columbian writers/poets, through the novel of the Revolution to the present. Emphasis on socio-cultural contexts as well as the literary values of the texts. Conducted in Spanish. Pre-requisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 463. Women Writers in Hispanic Literature. (4).

Women have long contributed to the wealth of literary production in the Spanish language. This course profiles the writings of women from different parts of the Hispanic world and may include issues of gender, race and ethnicity. Conducted in Spanish. Pre-requisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 470. Film in Spanish. (4).

This course introduces students to important developments in cinema in the Spanish-speaking cultures. Different types of film are shown and analyzed from an aesthetic perspective and in relationship to Spanish and Spanish American history, literature, art and society. Conducted in Spanish. Pre-requisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 482. Selected Topics. (1-4).

SPAN 482C. St: Selected Topic (core). (1-4).

Selected Topic approved for core requirement.

SPAN 485. Treasures of Peru II. (1).

This course is designed for those students who are interested in history, literature and cultures from Latin America and viewing literature and history from an analytical perspective. SPAN 485 is an interdisciplinary exploration of Peru through the study of literature and history. Students will immerse themselves in the history and the culture of Peru, building on the academic foundations laid in SPAN 482. This course is designed to be comparative and students will develop cross-cultural compentencies that will assist them in identifying and analyzing unique historical, cultural and aesthetic productions. Prerequisites: SPAN 482: "Treasures of Peru I".

SPAN 490. Independent Study. (1-4).

SPAN 492. Internship. (1-4).

SPAN 496. Directed Research. (1-3).