2019-2020 Graduate Catalog

Psychology Master's Programs

The psychology graduate programs at California Lutheran University are designed to develop competencies and skills for students to pursue a career in the helping professions. Master of Science degrees are offered in Counseling Psychology (with an Emphasis in Marital and Family Therapy) and in Clinical Psychology.

The MS Counseling Psychology program provides comprehensive and practical training focused on the development of counseling skills. This program meets all academic requirements for the California state license in marital and family therapy.

The MS Clinical Psychology program provides training in quantitative methods that is tailored toward preparing students for doctoral study in psychology or immediate employment in administrative or research positions related to work in the clinical and health sciences.  The program supports open science initiatives and provides instruction in the latest technological advances in statistical methods.

The psychology graduate programs can be completed using either a part-time or full-time schedule, which range from two years to three years for completion. The part-time schedule (2.5 to three years) is recommended for students with demanding work or personal responsibilities.

Students attend classes during the fall and spring semesters and also in summer terms. Classes are scheduled in the late afternoon and evening, and some classes are offered on Saturdays.

Graduate classes are taught by full-time professors and by professionals who integrate experiences from their professional practice into the classroom. The University takes pride in its accomplished faculty members who are committed to excellence in teaching.

Courses in the MS programs are 500 level courses.  700 level courses are doctoral courses taken by permission only.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Counseling Psychology and the Clinical Psychology programs will be considered for admission for the fall term only. Preference will be given to complete application portfolios submitted by January 15. All application documents and required interviews should be complete at least 45 days prior to the beginning of the desired start term. Admission requirements are as follows.

  1. Prerequisites:
    1. The Counseling Psychology (MFT) program requires prior coursework that includes:
      1. At least 3 credit hours of statistics and an additional 9 hours of undergraduate or graduate psychology courses. Grades of B or higher are preferred.
    2. The Clinical Psychology program requires prior coursework that includes:
      1. At least 3 credit hours of statistics with a grade of B or higher preferred and an additional 12 hours of undergraduate or graduate psychology courses.
  2. Interviews. Applicants should schedule an appointment with an admission counselor as early as possible. They will then be referred to the program director for a personal interview and program advisement
  3. Application. Applicants must submit a completed application form with a $50 application fee.
  4. Transcripts. An official transcript showing a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution is required.
  5. The general test for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required for the Clinical Psychology program and recommended for the Counseling Psychology (MFT) program. The test should be taken within the past 5 years. 50th percentile on the Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing scales is preferred. The psychology subject test of the GRE is recommended but not required.
  6. Two Recommendation Forms.
  7. Personal Statement. Candidates must submit a personal statement addressing personal interests, professional goals, and objectives for a career in psychology.
  8. Resume or Curriculum Vitae

Note: Applicants to the MS Counseling Psychology program must demonstrate personal aptitude for work as a marriage and family therapist. Letters of recommendation should address the aptitude and/or experience of the applicant for work in marriage and family therapy. The personal statement submitted by the applicant should include an examination of significant influences and events that have helped develop present values and approach to life, as well as ways in which these factors may contribute to preparation for a career as a therapist. Psychological testing may be used as an aid in determining readiness for graduate study in this program.

The University reserves the right throughout a student’s course of study to continually evaluate his or her personal suitability for professional involvement as a counselor. As part of this process, all MS Counseling Psychology students will be evaluated at the end of the first year to determine their suitability for proceeding on to the counseling practicum component of the program.

The Master of Science In Clinical Psychology

The Master of Science degree in Clinical Psychology is a 37- to 40-credit program emphasizing both research and clinical skills. This combination provides a strong foundation for continuing studies at the doctoral level or employment. The development of research skills takes place through completing advanced courses in statistics and research methods. Students have the option of successfully completing a comprehensive examination or of conducting their own research study and completing a thesis (which involves an additional three credits of coursework, for a total of 40 credits).

Clinical skills are developed in many of the courses offered in the Clinical Psychology program. Students gain an understanding of psychological disorders and methods of treating those disorders. They also develop skills in research methods, advanced statistical methods related to clinical psychology and specialized clinical training. Students are exposed to an overview of psychological testing and psychometric theory, and they learn how to effectively engage in program evaluation. Ethical issues related to research are emphasized in the program.

The Clinical Psychology program offers students the option of completing two courses in their second year that include advanced training in clinical or statistical methods.

A number of career options are available to graduates of the Clinical Psychology program. The curriculum is designed to prepare students who plan to continue their graduate studies in a doctoral program. The program is also a pathway for students who desire to complete a terminal master’s degree in psychology and do not intend to become a licensed practitioner. Many of our graduates choose this career path and are successfully employed overseeing treatment programs in mental health agencies. Graduates are also qualified for registration in California as a psychological assistant to work under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. They may also work in the community college system as instructors of psychology or as counselors.

Newly admitted students start the Clinical Psychology program in the summer or fall semester. Completion of the program generally takes two years if full-time and three years if part-time.

The Master of Science In Clinical Psychology

The Master of Science degree in Clinical Psychology is a 37- to 40-credit program emphasizing both research and clinical skills. This combination provides a strong foundation for continuing studies at the doctoral level or employment. The development of research skills takes place through completing advanced courses in statistics and research methods. Students have the option of successfully completing a comprehensive examination or of conducting their own research study and completing a thesis (which involves an additional three credits of course work, for a total of 40 credits).

Clinical skills are developed in many of the courses offered in the Clinical Psychology program. Students gain an understanding of psychological disorders and methods of treating those disorders. They also develop skills in research methods, advanced statistical methods related to clinical psychology and specialized clinical training. Students are exposed to an overview of psychological testing and psychometric theory, and they learn how to effectively engage in program evaluation. Ethical issues related to research are emphasized in the program.

The Clinical Psychology program offers students the option of completing two courses in their second year that include advanced training in clinical or statistical methods.

A number of career options are available to graduates of the Clinical Psychology program. The curriculum is designed to prepare students who plan to continue their graduate studies in a doctoral program. The program is also a pathway for students who desire to complete a terminal master’s degree in psychology and do not intend to become a licensed practitioner. Many of our graduates choose this career path and are successfully employed overseeing treatment programs in mental health agencies. Graduates are also qualified for registration in California as a psychological assistant to work under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. They may also work in the community college system as instructors of psychology or as counselors.

Newly admitted students start the Clinical Psychology program in the summer or fall semester. Completion of the program generally takes two years if full-time and three years if part-time.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Clinical Psychology

(34 credits)

Required Courses (25 credits)
PSYC 510Psychopathology3
PSYC 512Counseling Theories3
PSYC 520Law and Ethics2
PSYC 530Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing3
PSYC 532Behavior Clinical Methods3
PSYC 534Group Therapy2
PSYC 550Psychological & Relational Assessment3
PSYC 562Advanced Statistics3
PSYC 564Advanced Research Methods3
Electives (3 credits)
PSYC 565Research Practicum3
Select one of the following series: (6 credits)6
Principles Techniques Child Therapy and Prin Techniques Adolescent Therapy
Theories of the Recovery Model and Techniques of the Recovery Model
Comprehensive Exam or Thesis Option 10-3
Total Hours34-37

Program Probation, Remediation, and Dismissal (MS Clinical Psychology)

Program Probation

Program probation occurs when the core faculty of the MS Clinical Psychology program documents concerns about a student’s professional performance or a student’s performance in meeting professional competencies. Prior to being placed on program probation, a student will be reviewed by the core faculty of the program who will determine an appropriate remediation plan in consultation with appropriate administrators. Some examples of circumstances that can result in program probation include but are not limited to:

  1. The student fails the Competency Exam twice.

  2. Academic or professional deficiencies in any of the program competencies as noted by the faculty, staff, or supervisors.  

  3. The student engages in behavior that violates any of the rules or guidelines of the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct or California Lutheran University’s Standards of Conduct; the perceived severity of the offense is at the discretion of the faculty and associated university administrators and can determine whether the student receives probation or dismissal).

  4. Evidence of impairment that compromises academic or practicum activities.

Remediation

A remediation plan is written for a student if a concern has been raised about the student by a committee or external site. The remediation plan for the student will identify the specific program competency or competencies that need improvement and will articulate a path forward that will help the student be successful. The plan will include the:

1.      Description of the problem and means by which it was communicated to the student,

2.      Duration of the probationary period, not to exceed three semesters,

3.      Responsibilities of the student,

4.      Responsibilities of the program, and

5.      Method of evaluation at the end of the probationary period.

As part of a remediation plan the student may be required to retake coursework. Remediation ends if sufficient progress has been made on the remediation plan. In the event the problem has not been remediated, the student may be reviewed for suspension or dismissal.

Dismissal

Similar to the policies around program probation, academic dismissal can occur whenever a student incurs serious or repeated concerns regarding his or her fitness for the profession. Recommendations regarding a student’s dismissal are made by the program faculty to the Dean. A student has one week to appeal to the Provost a decision to dismiss. Some examples of circumstances that can result in dismissal from the program include but are not limited to:

  1. Students who are unable or unwilling to follow a remediation plan, or are unable to demonstrate sufficient improvement on a remediation plan.

  2.  MS Clinical Psychology students who do not pass the Competency Exam three times

  3.  Academic or professional deficiencies in any of the program competencies as noted by the faculty, staff, or supervisors.

  4.  Students who engage in unlawful behavior or violate any of the rules or guidelines of the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (MS Clinical Psychology student) or California Lutheran University’s Standards of Conduct (the perceived severity of the offense is at the discretion of the faculty and associated university administrators and can determine whether the student receives probation or dismissal).

  5. Evidence of impairment that compromises academic or practicum activities.

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology is a 60-credit program, which prepares the student to become a professional Marriage and Family Therapist. It is designed to meet all academic requirements for the California state license in marriage and family therapy. Licensing by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences requires a master’s degree with specified content, supervised counseling experience, a post-master’s internship, and two written examinations.

Marriage and family therapy has been described by the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists as “one of the most delicate and complex undertakings in the whole field of the helping professions.”

It requires all the skills taught in the usual academic training program for counseling and therapy, and in addition, a considerable amount of preparation in the dynamics of interpersonal interaction within marriage and the family setting.

Also required is a thorough understanding of the varied roles of intimate relationships, and the understanding of the psychodynamics of family systems and the context in which people live.

In addition, the family therapist needs specific preparation in the issues of child and adolescent clients as well as issues arising from the early life of adult clients.

The Counseling Psychology program is designed to prepare the student for this undertaking from a perspective which takes into account the human being as a whole person with physical, mental, emotional and spiritual dimensions, and which focuses on the family as an interactive system.

The focus of this program is on developing an integration of academic knowledge and clinical skills so that, at the time of graduation, students are well prepared as beginning marriage and family therapists. In addition, students develop personal insights and communication skills to enable them to work effectively in a wide variety of settings.

Over the years, graduates of the CLU program have an outstanding record of obtaining internships, passing the state licensing examinations, and establishing successful practices in both private and institutional fields.

Counseling Practicum

A special feature of the MS Counseling Psychology program is that all students may complete their practicum hours in a placement at CLU Community Counseling Services.

The Counseling Centers are low-cost community counseling facilities which provide an intensive on-site clinical training experience for graduate students. The clients who are seen by student therapists at the centers provide experience in working with a full range of marital, family, and child problems.

Individual supervision, group supervision, staff training, peer support and shared learning experiences, in an atmosphere designed to facilitate growth as a therapist, create exceptional opportunities. Each student-therapist experiences a variety of client types, client problems, and therapeutic approaches.

Work as a therapist is included, and up to 750 hours applicable to the California licensing requirement may be obtained. A fee is required in addition to tuition for the counseling practicum experience.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Counseling Psychology

(60 credits required)

Required Courses (54 Credits)
PSYC 510Psychopathology3
PSYC 512Counseling Theories3
PSYC 515Psychopharmacology2
PSYC 516Counseling Skills2
PSYC 517Lifespan and Family Development3
PSYC 518Gender and Sexuality3
PSYC 520Law and Ethics2
PSYC 522Cultural Diversity2
PSYC 524Substance Abuse and Dependency3
PSYC 526Domestic Violence and Abuse2
PSYC 530Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing3
PSYC 534Group Therapy2
PSYC 540Principles & Techniques Child Therapy3
PSYC 541Prin & Techniques Adolescent Therapy3
PSYC 542Principles & Techniques Couples Therapy3
PSYC 543Principles & Techniques Family Therapy3
PSYC 550Psychological & Relational Assessment3
PSYC 561Research Synthesis and Evaluation3
PSYC 591Counseling Practicum I2
PSYC 592Counseling Practicum II2
PSYC 593Counseling Practicum III2
Total Hours54

Graduate Psychology Elective Tracks (6 credits) (Subject to change)

Select a two-course series from the following:6
Theories of the Recovery Model and Techniques of the Recovery Model
Theories of Latino Counseling and Techniques of Latino Counseling
Attachment Theory and Attachment Techniques
Family Mediation Theory and Research and Family Mediation Application/Practice
Total Hours6

Graduate Psychology is offering the above elective tracks for students as well as post degree and post license individuals who have an interest in developing knowledge and skill in a specialized area.

Other Requirements

  1. Successful completion of a comprehensive examination. Please note the following policy related to absences. Students who do not show up on examination day without having an approved absence automatically fail the exam and it will be counted as an attempt. To be considered for an absence, students must submit a request to the program specialist, along with the reason/documentation for the absence in writing at least one week prior to the exam. Special consideration may be given for exceptional circumstances that are clearly beyond students’ control. The Law and Ethics Comprehensive Exam and Clinical Comprehensive Exam must be completed within two years of each initial exam registration.

  2. Personal experience in therapy is required for a minimum of 20 sessions. Students are encouraged to begin therapy in the second semester of the first year of the program and must complete the 20 hours of personal therapy with a licensed MFT, PsyD, PhD, or Social Worker before beginning practicum. Consult program adviser for details.

  3. A feature of the Counseling Psychology program is a 12-month practicum placement at CLU Community Counseling Services. Alternatively, students may request to complete the practicum experience at an external site such as a nonprofit counseling agency.  Please note the following policies related to grading for practicum courses. Students taking Practicum (591, 592, 593, 59X, 59S) complete class requirements in Practicum Seminar (this includes attending classes and completing case presentations) and clinical requirements at their practicum site. Pass is assigned when all class assignments and clinical requirements have been met, or, in the case of PSYC 59S, the clinical portion of the remediation plan has been successfully completed. IN is assigned in a practicum course if students meet any of these conditions: (a) one outstanding practicum seminar assignment, (b) have made insufficient progress in meeting clinical requirements in any practicum course, or (c) have not met all of the clinical requirements at the end of PSYC 593 (e.g., 225 clinical hours, community outreaches, turning in BBS paperwork, finishing documentation/case files). Students must register in PSYC 59X Counseling Practicum Continuation to complete any clinical requirements. No Credit is assigned when academic or professional concerns have been raised in a practicum seminar or on practicum. Such grades lead to review for probation or dismissal. If probation is indicated, as part of the remediation plan students may be required to take PSYC 59S Supplemental Counseling Practicum. Depending upon the remediation plan, PSYC 59S may be required prior to or at the same time as repeating the failed course.

Students who are placed in an external practicum continue to meet for weekly seminars on campus. Students begin the practicum with faculty approval after completing a minimum of 18 credits and PSYC 520 as well as 20 hours of personal psychotherapy with a licensed therapist.

Grading For MS Counseling Psychology Practicum Courses. Students taking Practicum (591, 592, 593, 594, 589S) complete class requirements in Practicum Seminar (this includes attending classes and completing case presentations) and clinical requirements at their practicum site.

  1. Pass is assigned when all class assignments and clinical requirements have been met, or, in the case of PSYC 589S, the clinical portion of the remediation plan has been successfully completed.

  2. IN is assigned in a practicum course if students meet any of these conditions: (a) one outstanding practicum seminar assignment, (b) have made insufficient progress in meeting clinical requirements in any practicum course, or (c) have not met all of the clinical requirements at the end of PSYC 593 (e.g., 225 clinical hours, community outreaches, turning in BBS paperwork, finishing documentation/case files). Students must register in PSYC 594 Counseling Practicum Continuation to complete any clinical requirements.

  3. No Credit is assigned when academic or professional concerns have been raised in a practicum seminar or on practicum. Such grades lead to review for probation or dismissal. If probation is indicated, as part of the remediation plan students may be required to take PSYC 589S Supplemental Counseling Practicum. Depending upon the remediation plan, PSYC 589S may be required prior to or at the same time as repeating the failed course.


 

Program Probation, Remediation, and Dismissal

(MS Counseling Psychology)

Program Probation

Program probation occurs when the core faculty of the MS program documents concerns about a student’s professional performance or a student’s performance in meeting professional competencies. Prior to being placed on program probation, a student will be reviewed by the core faculty of the MS program who will determine an appropriate remediation plan in consultation with appropriate administrators. Some examples of circumstances that can result in program probation include but are not limited to:

  1. The MS Counseling Psychology student fails either the Law and Ethics or Clinical exams twice.

  2.  Academic, professional, or clinical deficiencies in any of the program competencies as noted by the faculty, staff, or supervisors.  

  3. The student engages in behavior that violates any of the rules or guidelines of the AAMFT Code of Ethics, CAMFT Code of Ethics or California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) or California Lutheran University’s Standards of Conduct; the perceived severity of the offense is at the discretion of the faculty and associated university administrators and can determine whether the student receives probation or dismissal).

  4. Evidence of impairment that compromises academic or practicum activities.

Remediation

A remediation plan is written for a student if a concern has been raised about the student by a committee or training site. The remediation plan for the student will identify the specific program competency or competencies that need improvement and will articulate a path forward that will help the student be successful. The plan will include the:

1.      Description of the problem and means by which it was communicated to the student,

2.      Duration of the probationary period, not to exceed three semesters,

3.      Responsibilities of the student,

4.      Responsibilities of the program, and

5.      Method of evaluation at the end of the probationary period.

As part of a remediation plan the student may be required to retake coursework and for practicum/clinical remediation may be required to add one or two credits of PSYC 589S: Supplemental Counseling Practicum. Remediation ends if sufficient progress has been made on the remediation plan. In the event the problem has not been remediated, the student may be reviewed for suspension or dismissal.

Dismissal

Similar to the policies around program probation, academic dismissal can occur whenever a student incurs serious or repeated concerns regarding his or her fitness for the profession. Recommendations regarding a student’s dismissal are made by the program faculty to the Dean. A student has one week to appeal to the Provost a decision to dismiss. Some examples of circumstances that can result in dismissal from the program include but are not limited to:

  1. Students who are unable or unwilling to follow a remediation plan, or are unable to demonstrate sufficient improvement on a remediation plan.

  2. Students who fail either the Law and Ethics or Clinical exam three times.

  3. Students who do not pass the Law and Ethics and Clinical exam within two years of each initial registration.

  4. Academic, professional, or clinical deficiencies in any of the program competencies as noted by the faculty, staff, or supervisors.

  5. Students who engage in unlawful behavior or violate any of the rules or guidelines of the AAMFT Code of Ethics, CAMFT Code of Ethics or California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) or California Lutheran University’s Standards of Conduct (the perceived severity of the offense is at the discretion of the faculty and associated university administrators and can determine whether the student receives probation or dismissal).

  6. Evidence of impairment that compromises academic or practicum activities.

Courses

PSYC 501. Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills. (2).

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) skills training. Students are provided with a review of the theory, research, and practical application of DBT Skills across a variety of settings and populations.

PSYC 510. Psychopathology. (3).

Study of psychopathology using the DSM-5, including etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in abnormal psychology.

PSYC 512. Counseling Theories. (3).

The objectives of the course are to introduce students to traditional and contemporary models of counseling. Topics include theory and interventions stemming from psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, and systemic approaches.

PSYC 515. Psychopharmacology. (2).

Students gain an understanding of the role of pharmacology in the treatment of mental disorders. They become familiar with major classifications of psychotropic drugs and learn their modes of action.

PSYC 516. Counseling Skills. (2).

This course provides opportunities for students to learn theories and skills that are essential to the counseling relationship and process. The objectives of this course are to develop mastery of the theoretical material and basic skills in the practical aspects of counseling. Topics include: developing an alliance, counseling techniques, change processes, and systemic and relational factors impacting intervention. The course involves exposure to the therapy process through application of course topics to clinical examples.

PSYC 517. Lifespan and Family Development. (3).

Course examines the developmental changes and sociocultural events that take place during an individual lifespan from infancy to old age with a focus on development within the family. Topics include psychological characteristics, systemic and relational contexts, personal challenges and developmental opportunities for each individual and family developmental stage.

PSYC 518. Gender and Sexuality. (3).

Issues relating to gender identity, gender differences, gender socialization and related topics. An overview of physiological, psychological, and social-cultural variables associated with sexual identity, sexual behavior, and sexual dysfunction. Includes assessment and treatment of sexual abuse and its consequences.

PSYC 520. Law and Ethics. (2).

Law and ethics applicable to the professional practice of counseling and psychotherapy; scope of practice issues; mandated reporting laws including the assessment and reporting of child abuse.

PSYC 521. Clinical and Research Ethics. (2).

The purpose of the course is to cover a range of topics related to the values and ethics of conduct in clinical psychology. Clinically, the course will review issues related to ethics in private practice including privacy, confidentiality, and dual relationships. In terms of research, the course will review topics related to the values associated with open science including the importance of transparency, replication, and reproducibility.

PSYC 522. Cultural Diversity. (2).

Cultural variations in lifestyle and values, and the relationship of cultural issues to treatment procedures.

PSYC 524. Substance Abuse and Dependency. (3).

Course examines the impact of substance abuse and dependency on individual and family functioning. Topics include effects of psychoactive substances on the user and significant others, theories of substance abuse, diagnosis, and systemic assessment and treatment considerations.

PSYC 526. Domestic Violence and Abuse. (2).

Meets the California licensure requirement for training in assessment, detection, and intervention of domestic violence, interpersonal partner violence, and child abuse.

PSYC 530. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing. (3).

Knowledge and skills necessary for evaluations, diagnosis, preliminary case formulation, recommendations, and appropriate referrals. Communication skills are developed for effective therapeutic interactions.

PSYC 532. Behavior Clinical Methods. (3).

The purpose of this course is to provide students with basic skills required for competent practice of cognitive and behavioral therapies. Topics include behavioral assessment and analysis, behavior skills training, cognitive restructuring, contingency management, and exposure based procedures.

PSYC 533. Program Evaluation: Model & Techniques. (3).

This course covers basic concepts and procedures for evaluating service programs in clinical, health, and educational settings. The course serves as a graduate level introduction to program evaluation for students preparing for careers in education and the social and behavioral sciences. Prerequisites for the course include a basic knowledge of staristics and measurement.

PSYC 534. Group Therapy. (2).

The objectives of the course are to expose the students to theoretical models and research about group psychotherapy and provide students with the skills and knowledge to become comfortable and confident in the role of group psychotherapist. Topics include: therapeutic factors,group processes, change processes, and group leadership. The course also provides students with the skills to critically evaluate a variety of group psychotherapy techniques.

PSYC 540. Principles & Techniques Child Therapy. (3).

This course is designed to help the student appreciate the special nature of child psychotherapy. The course will explore a variety of therapeutic orientations including the psychodynamic, family systems, cognitive-behavioral and narrative approaches. Students will be expected to provide a critical analysis of the literature as well as be willing to explore their own personal views and beliefs. The course will teach the student to assess children for treatment and to arrive at a working diagnosis. The multifaceted issues of ethnicity and culture will also be examined as will issues of divorce, loss of caretakers and domestic abuse. The student will be expected to become familiar with both research and clinical literature as it relates to psychotherapy with children and to produce a scholarly research project. Lectures, movies and classroom activities will all be part of the educational experience.

PSYC 541. Prin & Techniques Adolescent Therapy. (3).

Course explores a variety of systemic therapeutic models of working with adolescents and their families.  Topics include assessment and treatment considerations specific to adolescent development, parent-child relationships and family therapy.

PSYC 542. Principles & Techniques Couples Therapy. (3).

The objectives of this course are to introduce students to family systems and other perspectives related to clinical work with couples and for students to learn various techniques and ways to apply theory specific to intervening with couples in a therapeutic context.  Topics include: Theoretical approaches to couples therapy, specific issues that impact couples, and couples therapy techniques.

PSYC 543. Principles & Techniques Family Therapy. (3).

The objectives of this course are to expose students to traditional and contemporary family therapy approaches and have the opportunity to apply theory to clinical examples and their own families of origin. Topics include systems theory, family relationships, and principles of applying family therapy techniques.

PSYC 544. Theories of the Recovery Model. (3).

Principles and philosophy of working with adults with serious mental illnesses. Use of functional assessment methods to analyze behavioral assets, excesses and deficits in order to define and plan rehabilitation goals.

PSYC 545. Techniques of the Recovery Model. (3).

Application of behavioral and social learning principles in working with adults with serious mental illnesses. Development of the ability to conduct skills training necessary for consumers to maintain independent living skills, interpersonal skills, social perception skills, problem-solving skills, and vocational skills.

PSYC 546. Psychological Trauma Concepts & Theories. (3).

This course focuses on the fundamental concepts, models and theories of psychological trauma. These topics include the definition of trauma; the history of trauma studies and treatment; the continuum of trauma; DSM 5 diagnostic criteria for PTSD and other trauma-related disorders; the role of dissociation in trauma; co-occurring disorders; types of trauma and traumatic stressors; theoretical models of traumatic stress and trauma treatment; and concepts of self-regulation. Attention will be paid to the relationship of trauma to physiology and neuro-biology; psychopharmacology; memory; development of the self; personality and character development; and other developmental, social and cultural factors. Students have an opportunity to investigate and research an area of individual interest in the field of trauma studies.

PSYC 547. Psyc Trauma: Assessment & Intervention. (3).

This course focuses on trauma assessment and treatment exploring topics such as risk assessment, resourcing, trauma processing, transference and countertransference issues, vicarious traumatization and therapist self-care, trauma integration and post-traumatic growth, treating child trauma victims, treating dissociation, and using mindfulness techniques and the expressive arts in trauma treatment. Students will have an opportunity to explore and practice trauma-oriented interventions. Pre-requisite: PSYC 546.

PSYC 550. Psychological & Relational Assessment. (3).

Course provides an introduction to the assessment process and the role it plays in systemic treatment.  Topics include the clinical application of specific psychological and relational assessments that are used when working systemically with individuals, couples and families.

PSYC 552. Psychometrics: Theory & Methods. (3).

Psychological assessment is a standard course in the training of a clinical psychologist and in the social and behavioral sciences in general. Standardized measures are used across all areas of social and behavioral science research and support researchers' ability to understand a variety of areas of interested form intelligence and personality to job performance evaluation. This course exposes students to methods by which social and behavioral scientists effectively measure these constructs. The course will review the philosophical and empirical underpinnings of measurement. Concepts including reliability and validity will be reviewed along with the practical application for conducting analyses in the R statistical programming language.

PSYC 560. STATS I: Exploratory Data Analysis. (3).

A good deal of statistics and research in psychological science involves the ability to conduct descriptive analyses and data visualizations. These skills can vary from data manipulation (arranging, renaming, filtering) and summarizing and basic statistical modeling. In this introductory course, students will be introduced to the R statistical programming language and provided training in these basic competencies.

PSYC 561. Research Synthesis and Evaluation. (3).

Research methodology, with a focus on developing skills in utilizing the professional literature. Emphasis will be given to helping students become knowledgeable consumers of research. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in statistics.

PSYC 562. Advanced Statistics. (3).

Advanced statistical methods, including univariate and multivariate analysis of variance, correlation, multiple regression, factor analysis, and other methods. Computer applications of statistical software for data analysis purposes will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Undergraduate statistics plus undergraduate experimental psychology or research methods.

PSYC 564. Advanced Research Methods. (3).

Research and evaluation methodology, including consideration of experimental, quasi-experimental, and other methods. Students write a detailed prospectus of a research project applying research methodology to a topic of interest. Prerequisite: PSYC 562.

PSYC 565. Research Practicum. (3).

Applied knowledge base and research skills necessary for successful completion of a thesis. Requires completion of the first three chapters of the thesis. Prerequisites: PSYC 564.

PSYC 566. Thesis. (3).

Supervised experience in conducting research for writing the master's thesis.

PSYC 567. STATS 3: Hierarchial Linear Mdlng. (3).

The course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of hierarchial linear models (HLM). Research data in the social sciences ae often grouped in ways that impact our statistical analyses (e.g., marital status, school/clinic/hospital setting, repeated treatment sessions). The course will cover growth curve modeling and meta-analysis as well as introduce models for dichotomous outcomes. The objective of the course is to provide students with an understanding of when and why HLM should be used and how to effectively apply the models to answer questions.

PSYC 569. Career Counseling: Theory & Practice. (3).

This course provides an overview of the models, systems, processes, programs, and procedures facing career counselors today. Methods of client analysis, vocational selection instruments, and new theories will be discussed. Students will leave this course with an ability to provide career counseling, an understanding of the underlying psychological foundations of career counseling, and the information needed to synthesize their own models of career counseling.

PSYC 570. Theories of Latino Counseling. (3).

The Latino Counseling Track with an emphasis on Theory explores psychological theories of development, pathology and normal functioning as examined from a Latino cultural perspective. The track considers issues such as the definition of self in Latino cultures and the implications that a different construction of self has for theories of development and treatment. The course challenges precepts in our psychological theories: For example, from what perspective is a culture-bound syndrome defined?; or, What is the role of a transitional object in a culture that values separation and individuation differently? The course provides a basic foundation for exploring techniques of psychotherapy with Latino populations.

PSYC 571. Techniques of Latino Counseling. (3).

The Latino Counseling Track with an emphasis on Technique draws on the theoretical implications covered in Part I of the Latino Track with an emphasis on Theory. In this course students see how theoretical implications find application in the clinical setting. The course addresses, for example, the possible function of code switching (switching between two languages) in the treatment of bilingual patients by bilingual therapists and its implications in terms of anxiety and defense. How do familial values get enacted in the treatment of patients of the same culture? What are the implications for treatment of culture bound syndromes, such as ataque de nervios? Prerequisite: PSYC-570.

PSYC 574. Attachment Theory. (3).

Attachment theory deals with the central human question of the formation of lasting connections. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of attachment theory as well as to basic research on various aspects of the theory. The course provides a developmental perspective on infant, child, and adult attachment. It also focuses on the interaction between the attachment and other behavioral systems, including the caregiving and sexual systems.

PSYC 575. Attachment Techniques. (3).

Drawing on the research and theoretical work examined in Attachment, Part I: Theory; this course reviews a number of attachment-based clinical applications in the work with couples, families, children and individuals. The course explores how current interventions with mothers who suffer from post-partum depression change the quality of a child's attachment, and how treatment with couples that focuses on elucidating attachment styles leads to meaningful change in quality of the relationship. The course critically examines current research assessing the clinical applications of attachment-based interventions. Prerequisite: PSYC-574.

PSYC 577. Family Mediation Theory and Research. (3).

This course will examine theories of conflict, family dynamics of divorce, child development implications, and mental health issues in divorce. Models of mediation of family disputes and alternate dispute resolution models will be introduced. Other topics to be studied include the legal context underlying divorce, legal remedies and limitations, as well as mental health interventions, including co-parenting therapy, reunification of parents and alienated children, and parent plan coordination.

PSYC 578. Family Mediation Application/Practice. (3).

Observation of and in vivo practice in family mediation of child custody and related issues will be introduced in this course. An overview of and practice in family mediation techniques will be presented. A main focus will be on the application of the theories covered in the first course on Family Mediation. Other topics will include management of conflicted families, interaction with court mediators, attorneys, and judicial officers and the principles of expert testimony. Prerequisite: PSYC-577.

PSYC 580. Theories of Counseling and Spirituality. (3).

This course will examine the ways in which spirituality is an influence upon the human experience. We will examine spirituality both from a theological perspective as it takes shape in various religions and as it impacts persons as a private and transcendent process. The goal of the course is to draw comparisons between psychotherapy and spirituality as processes that influence personal growth and change and to appreciate the role of spirituality in mental health recovery.

PSYC 581. Techniques of Counseling & Spirituality. (3).

This applied course picks up from the discussions of spirituality theories in the previous course and extends them into contributions for psychotherapeutic interventions. In particular, schools of psychotherapy represented by psychoanalysis, Jungian, existential/humanistic and the neurosciences will be used as the models for applying spirituality to the healing process. The student will learn how various interventions from these models address the transpersonal dimension of psychotherapy and how to consider the interventions as part of a comprehensive treatment approach. Prerequisite: PSYC-580.

PSYC 582. Selected Topics. (3).

Topics of current and particular interests or concern in counseling or clinical psychology. Students may enroll in more than one selected topics course.

PSYC 583. IPV: Adv Research, Theory & Technique. (3).

This course will examine the history of intimate partner violence from multiple perspectives including psychological and psychosocial understandings. Current research will be presented and multiple theoretical frameworks will be explored. In addition, the course will review current approaches to treating clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence including evidence-based practices. Cultural understanding and influences will also be studied.

PSYC 584. IPV: Adv Clinical Applications. (3).

This course will provide an in-depth examination, analysis and evaluation of current practices utilized in working with clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence. Students will examine research, view video of therapy sessions and present their own work with clients.

PSYC 589S. Supplement Counseling Practicum. (1-2).

The Supplemental Practicum is a supervised field experience that assists the student in remediating deficiencies that have come to the attention of the Practicum Committee. The specific nature of the practicum and its foci vary and are tailored to meet the training requirements of the student. Specifics of the Counseling Practicum vary, depending on the requirements of the Remediation Plan. Students attend practicum seminar while acquiring supervised clinical hours at either the CLU Community Counseling Services or an approved external practicum site. Clinical hours are applicable toward licensing requirements. There is an expectation of 10 hours of availability at the practicum site per week, per credit hour. Practicum fee in additional to tuition. This course does not substitute for the three required counseling practicum courses. Pre-requisite(s): PSYC 520, PSYC 530, Individual Therapy Requirement, completion of a minimum of 17 semester credits of coursework and consent of the Practicum Committee.

PSYC 590. Independent Study. (1-4).

Approved research in an area not covered by course work listed in this catalog.

PSYC 591. Counseling Practicum I. (2).

Students attend practicum seminar while acquiring supervised clinical hours at either CLU Community Counseling Services or an approved external practicum site. Students complete practicum seminar and clinical site requirements. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Clinical hours are applicable toward licensing requirements. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisites: PSYC 520, 530, Individual Theraphy Requirement, a minimum of 17 semester credits or coursework and consent of the Director or Clinical Training.

PSYC 592. Counseling Practicum II. (2).

Students attend practicum seminar while acquiring supervised clinical hours at either CLU Community Counseling Services or an approved external practicum site. Students complete practicum seminar and clinical site requirements. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Clinical hours are applicable toward licensing requirements. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisites: PSYC 591.

PSYC 593. Counseling Practicum III. (2).

Students attend practicum seminar while acquiring supervised clinical hours at either CLU Community Counseling Services or an approved external practicum site. Students complete practicum seminar and clinical site requirements. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum with the expectation of a minimum of 225 supervised clinical hours. Clinical hours are applicable toward licensing requirements.Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisites: PSYC 592.

PSYC 594. Counseling Practicum Continuation. (1-2).

This elective permits additional supervised clinical hours and does not substitute for the three required counseling practicum courses. Students attend practicum seminar while acquiring supervised clinical hours at either the CLU Community Counseling Services or an approved external practicum site. Clinical hours are applicable toward licensing requirements. There is an expectation of 10 hours of availability at the practicum site per week, per credit hour. Practicum fee in additional to tuition. Pre-requisites; PSYC 530, PSYC 520, Individual Therapy Requirement, completion of a minimum of 17 semester credits of coursework and consent of the Practicum Committee.

PSYC 599C. Thesis Continuation. (0).

PSYC 599D. Thesis Supervision. (1).