2013-2014 Graduate Catalog

Psychology Masters Programs

The psychology graduate programs at California Lutheran University are designed to develop competencies and skills for students to pursue a career in the helping professions. Master of Science degrees are offered in Counseling Psychology (with an Emphasis in Marital and Family Therapy) and in Clinical Psychology.

The Counseling Psychology program provides comprehensive and practical training focused on the development of counseling skills. This program meets all academic requirements for the California state license in marital and family therapy.

The Clinical Psychology program provides training in both counseling and research skills. This program is designed for students who wish to complete a terminal master’s degree and work in a mental health agency, or for students who plan to pursue a doctorate.

These intellectually rigorous programs offer a fascinating study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviors. Students in both programs develop effective interpersonal communication skills, gain a thorough understanding of professional legal and ethical responsibilities and acquire knowledge of major theories and interventions in counseling.

Additionally, all students in the psychology graduate programs are trained to utilize the technology available through CLU’s award-winning computer network system. These stimulating programs of learning promote both personal and professional growth.

The psychology graduate programs can be completed using either a part-time or full-time schedule, which range from two years to three years for completion. The part-time schedule (2.5 to three years) is recommended for students with demanding work or personal responsibilities.

Students attend classes during the fall and spring semesters and also in summer terms. Classes are scheduled in the late afternoon and evening, and some classes are offered on Saturdays.

Graduate classes are taught by full-time professors and by professionals who integrate experiences from their professional practice into the classroom. The University takes pride in its accomplished faculty members who are committed to excellence in teaching.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Counseling Psychology and the Clinical Psychology programs will be considered for admission for the fall term only. Preference will be given to complete application portfolios submitted by March 1. In addition, there is an early admission program, the deadline for which is October 1. All application documents and required interviews should be complete at least 45 days prior to the beginning of the desired start term. Admission requirements are as follows.

  1. Prerequisites:
    1. The Counseling Psychology (MFT) program requires prior coursework that includes:
      1. General Psychology (Introduction to Psychology)
      2. Abnormal Psychology
      3. One of the following:
        1. Physiological Psychology
        2. Statistics
        3. Research Methods
        4. Experimental Psychology
    2. The Clinical Psychology program requires prior coursework that includes:
      1. General Psychology
      2. (Introduction to Psychology)
      3. Developmental Psychology
      4. (Child, Adult or Lifespan)
      5. Abnormal Psychology
      6. Statistics
      7. Research Methods or Experimental Psychology
  2. Interviews. Applicants should schedule an appointment with an admission counselor as early as possible. They will then be referred to the program director for a personal interview and program advisement
  3. Application. Applicants must submit a completed application form with a $50 application fee.
  4. Transcripts. An official transcript showing a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution is required.
  5. Graduate Record Examination (GRE). This exam is required for applicants who earned their undergraduate degree in a foreign country and candidates whose official transcripts do not reflect the following:
    1. An undergraduate, upper division GPA of 3.0 or higher; or
    2. A combined GPA of 3.0 or higher for the most recent 60 credits of study consisting of any of the following: graduate course work, upper division postbaccalaureate course work (exclusive of extension or continuing education work), and upper division undergraduate course work; or
    3. A minimum of nine credits of graduate course work with a GPA of at least 3.5; or
    4. A previously earned master’s degree.
  6. Two Recommendation Forms.
  7. Personal Statement. Candidates must submit a personal statement addressing personal interests, professional goals, and objectives for a career in psychology.

Note: Applicants to the Counseling Psychology program must demonstrate personal aptitude for work as a marriage and family therapist. Letters of recommendation should address the aptitude and/or experience of the applicant for work in marriage and family therapy. The personal statement submitted by the applicant should include an examination of significant influences and events that have helped develop present values and approach to life, as well as ways in which these factors may contribute to preparation for a career as a therapist. Psychological testing may be used as an aid in determining readiness for graduate study in this program.

The University reserves the right throughout a student’s course of study to continually evaluate his or her personal suitability for professional involvement as a counselor. As part of this process, all Counseling Psychology students will be evaluated at the end of the first year to determine their suitability for proceeding on to the counseling practicum component of the program. Faculty assessment using psychological testing and other evaluation techniques may be used to assist in the determination.

 

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology is a 60-credit program, which prepares the student to become a professional Marriage and Family Therapist. It is designed to meet all academic requirements for the California state license in marriage and family therapy. Licensing by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences requires a master’s degree with specified content, supervised counseling experience, a post-master’s internship, and two written examinations.

Marriage and family therapy has been described by the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists as “one of the most delicate and complex undertakings in the whole field of the helping professions.”

It requires all the skills taught in the usual academic training program for counseling and therapy, and in addition, a considerable amount of preparation in the dynamics of interpersonal interaction within marriage and the family setting.

Also required is a thorough understanding of the varied roles of intimate relationships, and the understanding of the psychodynamics of family systems and the context in which people live.

In addition, the family therapist needs specific preparation in the issues of child and adolescent clients as well as issues arising from the early life of adult clients.

The Counseling Psychology program is designed to prepare the student for this undertaking from a perspective which takes into account the human being as a whole person with physical, mental, emotional and spiritual dimensions, and which focuses on the family as an interactive system.

The focus of this program is on developing an integration of academic knowledge and clinical skills so that, at the time of graduation, students are well prepared as beginning marriage and family therapists. In addition, students develop personal insights and communication skills to enable them to work effectively in a wide variety of settings.

Over the years, graduates of the CLU program have an outstanding record of obtaining internships, passing the state licensing examinations, and establishing successful practices in both private and institutional fields.

Counseling Practicum

A special feature of the California Lutheran University Counseling Psychology program is a 12-month practicum placement in one of the University’s two Community Counseling Parent Child Study Centers.

The Centers are low-cost community counseling facilities which provide an intensive on-site clinical training experience for graduate students. The clients who are seen by student therapists at the centers provide experience in working with a full range of marital, family, and child problems.

Individual supervision, group supervision, staff training, peer support and shared learning experiences, in an atmosphere designed to facilitate growth as a therapist, create exceptional opportunities. Each student-therapist experiences a variety of client types, client problems, and therapeutic approaches.

Work as a therapist is included, and up to 750 hours applicable to the California licensing requirement may be obtained. A fee is required in addition to tuition for the counseling practicum experience.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Counseling Psychology

(60 credits required)

Required Courses (54 Credits)
PSYC 510Psychopathology3
PSYC 512Systems of Counseling and Psychology3
PSYC 515Survey of Psychopharmacology2
PSYC 516Counseling Skills2
PSYC 517Lifespan Development3
PSYC 518Gender and Sexuality3
PSYC 520Law and Ethics2
PSYC 522Cultural Diversity2
PSYC 524Substance Abuse and Dependency3
PSYC 526Domestic Violence and Abuse2
PSYC 530Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing3
PSYC 534Group Therapy2
PSYC 540Principles and Techniques in Child Therapy3
PSYC 541Principles and Techniques in Adolescent Therapy3
PSYC 542Principles and Techniques in Couples Therapy3
PSYC 543Principles and Techniques in Family Therapy3
PSYC 550Survey of Psychological Testing3
PSYC 561Research Synthesis and Evaluation3
PSYC 591Counseling Practicum I2
PSYC 592Counseling Practicum II2
PSYC 593Counseling Practicum III2
Total Hours54

 

Graduate Psychology Elective Tracks (6 credtis) (Subject to change)

Select a two-course series from the following:6
Theories of the Recovery Model
   and Techniques of the Recovery Model
Theories of Latino Counseling
   and Techniques of Latino Counseling
Attachment Theory
   and Attachment Techniques
Family Mediation Theory and Research
   and Family Mediation Application and Practice
Total Hours6

Graduate Psychology is offering the above elective tracks for students as well as post degree and post license individuals who have an interest in developing knowledge and skill in a specialized area.

Other Requirements

  1. Successful completion of a comprehensive examination.

  2. Personal experience in therapy is required for a minimum of 20 sessions. Students are encouraged to begin therapy in the second semester of the first year of the program and must complete the 20 hours of personal therapy before beginning Practicum at the Counseling Center. Consult program adviser for details.

  3. A special feature of the Counseling Psychology program is a 12-month practicum placement in one of the University’s two Community Counseling Parent Child Study Centers. Alternatively, students may request to complete the practicum experience at an external site such as a nonprofit counseling agency.

Students who are placed in an external practicum continue to meet for weekly seminars at CLU’s Community Counseling Parent Child Study Centers. Students begin the practicum with faculty approval after completing a minimum of 18 credits and PSYC 520 as well as 20 hours of personal psychotherapy.

 

The Master of Science In Clinical Psychology

The Master of Science degree in Clinical Psychology is a 34- to 37-credit program emphasizing both research and clinical skills. This combination provides a strong foundation for the advanced study of psychology. The development of research skills takes place through completing advanced courses in statistics and research methods. Students have the option of successfully completing a comprehensive examination or of conducting their own research study and completing a thesis (which involves an additional 3 credits of course work, for a total of 37 credits).

Clinical skills are developed in many of the courses offered in the Clinical Psychology program. Students gain an understanding of psychological disorders and methods of treating those disorders. They also develop skills in interviewing, group therapy and applied behavior analysis. Students are exposed to an overview of psychological testing, and they learn how to effectively develop treatment plans and engage in program evaluation. Legal and ethical issues related to both research and counseling are emphasized in the program.

The Clinical Psychology program offers students the option of completing two courses in child and adolescent therapy or two courses in the recovery model which focus on working with adults who have serious mental illnesses.

The courses in the recovery model emphasize the goal of improving the quality of life for the seriously mentally ill by assisting them in functioning as independently as possible. Students choosing the two-course sequence in the recovery model develop skills in areas such as symptom assessment, functional assessment, and skills training.

The two-course sequences in child and adolescent therapy or in the recovery model provide an opportunity for students to focus on treatment techniques related to a particular population.

A number of career options are available to graduates of the Clinical Psychology program. The curriculum is designed to prepare students who plan to continue their graduate studies in a doctoral program.

The program is also designed for students who desire to complete a terminal master’s degree in psychology and do not intend to become a licensed practitioner. Many of our graduates choose this career path and are successfully employed overseeing treatment programs in mental health agencies.

Graduates of the Clinical Psychology program are also qualified for registration in California as a psychological assistant to work under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. Additionally, graduates are qualified for employment in the community college system as instructors of psychology or as counselors.

Newly admitted students start the Clinical Psychology program in the summer or fall semester. Completion of the program generally takes two years if full time and three years if part time.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Clinical Psychology

(34 credits)

Required Courses (25 credits)
PSYC 510Psychopathology3
PSYC 512Systems of Counseling and Psychology3
PSYC 520Law and Ethics2
PSYC 530Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing3
PSYC 532Applied Behavior Analysis3
PSYC 534Group Therapy2
PSYC 550Survey of Psychological Testing3
PSYC 562Advanced Statistics3
PSYC 564Advanced Research Methods3
Electives (3 credits)
PSYC 565Research Practicum3
Select one of the following series: (6 credits)6
Principles and Techniques in Child Therapy
   and Principles and Techniques in Adolescent Therapy
Theories of the Recovery Model
   and Techniques of the Recovery Model
Comprehensive Exam or Thesis Option 10-3
Total Hours34-37

1

Students must either take a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis, which requires taking an additional course, PSYC 566. Students choosing to take PSYC 566 will need to takePSYC 565 as a prerequisite.


Courses

PSYC 510. Psychopathology. (3).

Study of psychopathology using the DSM-IV, including etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in abnormal psychology.

PSYC 512. Systems of Counseling and Psychology. (3).

Major theories and interventions in counseling and psychotherapy.

PSYC 515. Survey of Psychopharmacology. (2).

Students gain an understanding of the role of pharmacology in the treatment of mental disorders. They become familiar with major classifications of psychotropic drugs and learn their modes of action.

PSYC 516. Counseling Skills. (2).

PSYC 517. Lifespan Development. (3).

Current theories and research in cognitive, physical, social and emotional development over the life span. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in child or lifespan development.

PSYC 518. Gender and Sexuality. (3).

Issues relating to gender identity, gender differences, gender socialization and related topics. An overview of physiological, psychological, and social-cultural variables associated with sexual identity, sexual behavior, and sexual dysfunction. Includes assessment and treatment of sexual abuse and its consequences.

PSYC 520. Law and Ethics. (2).

Law and ethics applicable to the professional practice of counseling and psychotherapy; scope of practice issues; mandated reporting laws including the assessment and reporting of child abuse.

PSYC 522. Cultural Diversity. (2).

Cultural variations in lifestyle and values, and the relationship of cultural issues to treatment procedures.

PSYC 524. Substance Abuse and Dependency. (3).

Meets the California licensure requirement for training in the detection and treatment of alcoholism and other chemical abuse and dependency.

PSYC 526. Domestic Violence and Abuse. (2).

Meets the California licensure requirement for training in assessment, detection, and intervention of domestic violence, interpersonal partner violence, and child abuse.

PSYC 530. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing. (3).

Knowledge and skills necessary for evaluations, diagnosis, preliminary case formulation, recommendations, and appropriate referrals. Communication skills are developed for effective therapeutic interactions.

PSYC 532. Applied Behavior Analysis. (3).

Principles and techniques for performing a functional analysis of problematic behavior using principles of single-case experimental design to develop and evaluate intervention strategies.

PSYC 534. Group Therapy. (2).

Examines group formats for therapeutic change.

PSYC 540. Principles and Techniques in Child Therapy. (3).

This course is designed to help the student appreciate the special nature of child psychotherapy. The course will explore a variety of therapeutic orientations including the psychodynamic, family systems, cognitive-behavioral and narrative approaches. Students will be expected to provide a critical analysis of the literature as well as be willing to explore their own personal views and beliefs. The course will teach the student to assess children for treatment and to arrive at a working diagnosis. The multifaceted issues of ethnicity and culture will also be examined as will issues of divorce, loss of caretakers and domestic abuse. The student will be expected to become familiar with both research and clinical literature as it relates to psychotherapy with children and to produce a scholarly research project. Lectures, movies and classroom activities will all be part of the educational experience.

PSYC 541. Principles and Techniques in Adolescent Therapy. (3).

This course is designed to help the student appreciate the special nature of adolescent psychotherapy. The course will explore a variety of therapeutic orientations including the psychodynamic, family systems, cognitive-behavioral and neuropsychological. Students will be expected to provide a critical analysis of the literature as well as be willing to explore their own personal views and beliefs. Findings from research in adolescent development will be integrated with the literature on psychotherapy to help guide the student in constructing effective treatment plans. Clinical assessments will be taught that include DSM diagnoses as well as the impact of situational factors such as peer pressures, substance abuse, sexuality and violence. The student will be expected to become familiar with both research and clinical literature as it relates to psychotherapy with adolescents and to produce a scholarly research project. Lectures, movies and classroom activities will all be part of the educational experience.

PSYC 542. Principles and Techniques in Couples Therapy. (3).

Marital relationships; various approaches to marital therapy; assessment and intervention; issues of divorce.

PSYC 543. Principles and Techniques in Family Therapy. (3).

Family relationships; application of family therapy theory and techniques.

PSYC 544. Theories of the Recovery Model. (3).

Principles and philosophy of working with adults with serious mental illnesses. Use of functional assessment methods to analyze behavioral assets, excesses and deficits in order to define and plan rehabilitation goals.

PSYC 545. Techniques of the Recovery Model. (3).

Application of behavioral and social learning principles in working with adults with serious mental illnesses. Development of the ability to conduct skills training necessary for consumers to maintain independent living skills, interpersonal skills, social perception skills, problem-solving skills, and vocational skills.

PSYC 550. Survey of Psychological Testing. (3).

Introductory survey of assessment issues, acquainting students with techniques of assessment and an understanding of the use of testing and test results.

PSYC 561. Research Synthesis and Evaluation. (3).

Research methodology, with a focus on developing skills in utilizing the professional literature. Emphasis will be given to helping students become knowledgeable consumers of research. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in statistics.

PSYC 562. Advanced Statistics. (3).

Advanced statistical methods, including univariate and multivariate analysis of variance, correlation, multiple regression, factor analysis, and other methods. Computer applications of statistical software for data analysis purposes will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Undergraduate statistics plus undergraduate experimental psychology or research methods.

PSYC 564. Advanced Research Methods. (3).

Research and evaluation methodology, including consideration of experimental, quasi-experimental, and other methods. Students write a detailed prospectus of a research project applying research methodology to a topic of interest. Prerequisite: PSYC 562.

PSYC 565. Research Practicum. (3).

Applied knowledge base and research skills necessary for successful completion of a thesis. Requires completion of the first three chapters of the thesis. Prerequisites: PSYC 564.

PSYC 566. Thesis. (3).

Supervised experience in conducting research for writing the master's thesis.

PSYC 569. Career Counseling: Theory & Practice. (3).

This course provides an overview of the models, systems, processes, programs, and procedures facing career counselors today. Methods of client analysis, vocational selection instruments, and new theories will be discussed. Students will leave this course with an ability to provide career counseling, an understanding of the underlying psychological foundations of career counseling, and the information needed to synthesize their own models of career counseling.

PSYC 570. Theories of Latino Counseling. (3).

The Latino Counseling Track with an emphasis on Theory explores psychological theories of development, pathology and normal functioning as examined from a Latino cultural perspective. The track considers issues such as the definition of self in Latino cultures and the implications that a different construction of self has for theories of development and treatment. The course challenges precepts in our psychological theories: For example, from what perspective is a culture-bound syndrome defined?; or, What is the role of a transitional object in a culture that values separation and individuation differently? The course provides a basic foundation for exploring techniques of psychotherapy with Latino populations.

PSYC 571. Techniques of Latino Counseling. (3).

The Latino Counseling Track with an emphasis on Technique draws on the theoretical implications covered in Part I of the Latino Track with an emphasis on Theory. In this course students see how theoretical implications find application in the clinical setting. The course addresses, for example, the possible function of code switching (switching between two languages) in the treatment of bilingual patients by bilingual therapists and its implications in terms of anxiety and defense. How do familial values get enacted in the treatment of patients of the same culture? What are the implications for treatment of culture bound syndromes, such as ataque de nervios? Prerequisite: PSYC-570.

PSYC 574. Attachment Theory. (3).

Attachment theory deals with the central human question of the formation of lasting connections. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of attachment theory as well as to basic research on various aspects of the theory. The course provides a developmental perspective on infant, child, and adult attachment. It also focuses on the interaction between the attachment and other behavioral systems, including the caregiving and sexual systems.

PSYC 575. Attachment Techniques. (3).

Drawing on the research and theoretical work examined in Attachment, Part I: Theory; this course reviews a number of attachment-based clinical applications in the work with couples, families, children and individuals. The course explores how current interventions with mothers who suffer from post-partum depression change the quality of a child's attachment, and how treatment with couples that focuses on elucidating attachment styles leads to meaningful change in quality of the relationship. The course critically examines current research assessing the clinical applications of attachment-based interventions. Prerequisite: PSYC-574.

PSYC 577. Family Mediation Theory and Research. (3).

This course will examine theories of conflict, family dynamics of divorce, child development implications, and mental health issues in divorce. Models of mediation of family disputes and alternate dispute resolution models will be introduced. Other topics to be studied include the legal context underlying divorce, legal remedies and limitations, as well as mental health interventions, including co-parenting therapy, reunification of parents and alienated children, and parent plan coordination.

PSYC 578. Family Mediation Application and Practice. (3).

Observation of and in vivo practice in family mediation of child custody and related issues will be introduced in this course. An overview of and practice in family mediation techniques will be presented. A main focus will be on the application of the theories covered in the first course on Family Mediation. Other topics will include management of conflicted families, interaction with court mediators, attorneys, and judicial officers and the principles of expert testimony. Prerequisite: PSYC-577.

PSYC 580. Theories of Counseling and Spirituality. (3).

This course will examine the ways in which spirituality is an influence upon the human experience. We will examine spirituality both from a theological perspective as it takes shape in various religions and as it impacts persons as a private and transcendent process. The goal of the course is to draw comparisons between psychotherapy and spirituality as processes that influence personal growth and change and to appreciate the role of spirituality in mental health recovery.

PSYC 581. Techniques of Counseling and Spirituality. (3).

This applied course picks up from the discussions of spirituality theories in the previous course and extends them into contributions for psychotherapeutic interventions. In particular, schools of psychotherapy represented by psychoanalysis, Jungian, existential/humanistic and the neurosciences will be used as the models for applying spirituality to the healing process. The student will learn how various interventions from these models address the transpersonal dimension of psychotherapy and how to consider the interventions as part of a comprehensive treatment approach. Prerequisite: PSYC-580.

PSYC 582. Selected Topics. (3).

Topics of current and particular interests or concern in counseling or clinical psychology. Students may enroll in more than one selected topics course.

PSYC 583. Intimate Partner Violence: Advanced Research, Theory, and Technique. (3).

This course will examine the history of intimate partner violence from multiple perspectives including psychological and psychosocial understandings. Current research will be presented and multiple theoretical frameworks will be explored. In addition, the course will review current approaches to treating clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence including evidence-based practices. Cultural understanding and influences will also be studied.

PSYC 584. Intimate Partner Violence: Advanced Clinical Applications. (3).

This course will provide an in-depth examination, analysis and evaluation of current practices utilized in working with clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence. Students will examine research, view video of therapy sessions and present their own work with clients.

PSYC 590. Independent Study. (1-4).

Approved research in an area not covered by course work listed in this catalog.

PSYC 591. Counseling Practicum I. (2).

Placement in the University's Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Center or external practicum site. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Hours applicable to licensing requirement. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisites: PSYC 530 and consent of center director.

PSYC 592. Counseling Practicum II. (2).

Placement in the University's Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Center or external practicum site. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Hours applicable to licensing requirement. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: PSYC 591.

PSYC 593. Counseling Practicum III. (2).

Placement in the University's Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Center or external practicum site. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Hours applicable to licensing requirement. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: PSYC 592.

PSYC 599C. Thesis Continuation. (1).

PSYC 599D. Thesis Supervision. (1).

PSYC 701. Research Seminar 1. (1).

Throughout the first two years of the program, five to seven students work with a faculty member who mentors student research. The class will introduce various research methodologies used in clinical psychology and assist students in exploring their research interests.

PSYC 702. Research Seminar 2. (1).

A continuation of PSYC-701, this course will focus on introducing students to various research tools and strategies as students develop their research projects. Specific attention will be given to developing the literature review. It is expected that students will complete their literature reviews over the summer.

PSYC 703. Research Seminar 3. (1).

A continuation of PSYC-702, this course assists students in becoming familiar with completing IRB forms, developing the methodology sections of their research projects, and examining the ethics of research and data collection. By the completion of this course, students are expected to have a completed proposal and be ready for data collection.

PSYC 704. Research Seminar 4. (1).

A continuation of PSYC-703, this course examines data analysis and writing results. By the completion of this course, students are expected to have completed their second year projects, which may function as pilot studies for the dissertation project.

PSYC 705. Research Methods 1. (3).

This course examines qualitative and correlational research designs including case studies, survey research, focus groups, conducting interviews and collecting data to support hypotheses regarding possible relationships and associations. In addition, students will learn the appropriate statistical analyses to use with qualitative and correlational research. Issues involving validity, bias and cultural diversity in research will be addressed.

PSYC 706. Research Methods 2. (3).

This course examines quantitative research designs including experimental, quasi-experimental, multivariate, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. In addition, students will gain experience using SPSS for analysis of variance and covariance, simple effects analysis, factorial designs and multivariate analysis of variance.

PSYC 711. Colloquia 1. (1).

Professionals in the mental health field will conduct presentations on a wide range of issues that are relevant to careers in psychology. By drawing on local resources, the colloquia series addresses issues that are particularly applicable to our neighboring communities. The colloquia also include formal clinical case presentations from students, faculty and invited guests.

PSYC 712. Colloquia 2. (1).

Continuation of PSYC 711.

PSYC 713. Colloquia 3. (1).

Continuation of PSYC 712.

PSYC 714. Colloquia 4. (1).

Continuation of PSYC 713.

PSYC 716. Biological Aspects of Behavior. (3).

This course examines brain-behavior relationships. An emphasis is placed on understanding neuropsychological functions, physiological mechanisms and biochemical processes.

PSYC 717. Human Development. (3).

This course examines theory and research related to lifespan development. Clinical application of course material will be emphasized.

PSYC 718. Cognitive-Affective Aspects of Behavior. (3).

This course examines current theory and research in human cognitive and affective. The impact of cognitive and affective processes on the individual are studied and applied to clinical material.

PSYC 719. Social Psychology. (3).

This course examines the social and cultural bases of human behavior by examining relevant theory and research. Consideration is given to the ethnic/cultural issues that impact clinical practice.

PSYC 721. Practicum 1. (2).

The Practicum is structured to provide clinical experience in conducting psychotherapy. Students provide psychotherapy services to clients at the Community Counseling and Parent Child Study Center under the close supervision of licensed clinicians who are part of the Psy.D. program's clinical faculty. In addition to direct face-to-face contact and supervision, the practicum also provides supervised training in assessment, using standard test batteries that include intelligence tests, projective tests and self-report inventories. In practicum, students acquire the skills to present test findings to their clients and integrate assessment into their clinical practice.

PSYC 722. Practicum 2. (2).

Continuation of Psyc-721.

PSYC 723. Practicum 3. (2).

Continuation of PSYC 722.

PSYC 724. Practicum 4. (2).

Continuation of PSYC 723.

PSYC 725. Practicum 5. (2).

Continuation of PSYC 724.

PSYC 726. Practicum 6. (2).

Continuation of PSYC 725.

PSYC 728. Case Conference 1. (1).

As part of this yearlong seminar, students present information from clinical intakes that they are conducting as part of their practicum, as well as information on ongoing treatments, to a small group of peers and supervisors. The case conference gives each student the opportunity to develop skills in discussing presenting problems, diagnostic impressions, psychodynamic case formulation and treatment planning.

PSYC 729. Case Conference 2. (1).

Continuation of PSYC 728.

PSYC 731. Dissertation Reserach Seminar 1. (1).

This course is designed for five to seven students led by a faculty member who will mentor students through the dissertation project process. Students will support one another by acting as peer mentors in the course as dissertation proposals are explored.

PSYC 732. Dissertation Research Seminar 2. (1).

A continuation of PSYC-731, this course continues to provide support for students as they actively develop their dissertation projects. At the conclusion of this course, students are expected to have completed their proposals, chosen a dissertation committee, and successfully defended their proposals. They should be ready for data collection and analysis over the summer.

PSYC 733. Dissertation Research Seminar 3. (1).

A continuation of PSYC-732, this course supports students as they analyze data and begin to write the results chapter of their dissertation projects.

PSYC 734. Dissertation Research Seminar 4. (1).

A continuation of PSYC-733, this course provides support for students as they complete their dissertation projects. In addition, students explore various methods of presenting their research including journal articles, conferences and community forums. Students are expected to complete their final defense by the conclusion of this course and are encouraged to present and publish their work.

PSYC 735. Dissertation Supervision. (2).

This course is intended for students who have not completed their dissertations within the first four years of coursework and who require additional supervision.

PSYC 740. Diagnostic Interviewing. (3).

Diagnostic and therapeutic interviewing skills are essential for a clinician. In this course, students will develop techniques for conducting diagnostic interviews of clients with a range of symptoms and psychological disorders. The course involves hands-on interviewing exercises and a review of etiological and treatment issues specific to psychological disorders, such as anxiety, depression and eating disorder. Includes interviewing strategies that focus on symptoms, behaviors and dynamics that are specific to each disorder.

PSYC 741. Basic Attending Skills. (2).

This course examines one of the basic skills necessary for effective psychotherapy - the development of listening skills. The course explores concepts such as empathy, sympathy, reassurance, the importance of process versus content, and the importance of examining obstacles that interfere with a therapist's basic listening skills, including countertransference.

PSYC 742. Frame. (2).

Frame refers to the establishing and maintaining of a therapeutic structure of protocols, guidelines, boundaries and any other technical parameters. The handling of frame constitutes a critically important skill for the treatment of character pathology, serious mental disorders and other complex treatments. Students will learn and have the opportunity to practice these skills in role-play and simulated therapy sessions. They will also be presented with videos of therapy sessions where they can critique other clinician's attempts to manage frames.

PSYC 743. Child and Adolescent Interventions. (2).

This course will examine specific treatment strategies for psychotherapy from the approaches of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral and family systems theories. Students will learn how to organize their clinical interventions according to these psychotherapeutic models and how to direct their treatment goals accordingly.

PSYC 744. Principles of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. (2).

The course surveys some of the basic treatment modalities that fall under the rubric of psychodynamic psychotherapies, including perspectives from object relations, self psychology, ego psychology and interpersonal psychology. Students develop the capacity for distinguishing and finding points of convergence between the different theoretical perspectives and their application in clinical practice. Traditional concepts such as transference, countertransference, resistance, neutrality and compromise formation are discussed. This course also addresses the role of enactments, self-disclosure and insight in effecting therapeutic change.

PSYC 745. ABA and CBT Interventions. (3).

This course examines the conceptual foundations underlying behavioral and cognitive approaches to assessment and treatment. The principles and techniques of applied behavioral analysis and cognitive behavioral therapy will be reviewed. In addition, relevant outcome research will be presented to support the use of these therapies with specific populations.

PSYC 746. Couples and Family Therapy. (2).

This is an advanced course on the study of conjoint therapy with couples and families. A number of theoretical perspectives and related clinical techniques will be studied including cognitive-behavioral, system theory and psychodynamic approaches. The intervention techniques can be applied with pre-marital couples for couple enrichment and as part of psychotherapy with distressed couples. Interventions will be taught for dealing with a variety of marital and divorce issues, e.g., dual-career, multicultural/multinational, domestic violence, alcoholism and remarriage. Instruction is through lecture, discussions, role-playing and video. Students will complete a course project either through a practicum experience or some other applied experience developed with the instructor.

PSYC 747. Group Psychotherapy. (2).

This course is designed to help students learn about group theory and the practice of group psychotherapy. Students acquire information and skills on different types of psychotherapy groups, including inpatient and outpatient groups, as well as psycho-educational groups, symptom-focused groups (e.g., eating disorder group), and others. The course examines the value, as well as the potential for iatrogenic effects, of group work as it is impacted by diagnostic categories, age populations and other relevant factors.

PSYC 750. Child and Adolescent Disorders. (3).

This course will integrate psychological and neuroscientific research on child and adolescent development with issues of learning disabilities, behavioral and impulse disorders, addictions and other psychopathologies. The student will understand how psychological, social, cultural and biological factors influence the problems and disorders experienced by children and adolescents.

PSYC 751. Personality and Dissociative Disorders. (3).

This course is designed to review the major theories of personality and dissociative disorders, addressing psychoanalytic, behavioral and humanistic schools of thought, as well as biological approaches that include the study of genetics and heritability. The course takes a developmental approach to the study of these disorders and examines points of convergence and divergence between the different theories.

PSYC 752. Mood and Anxiety Disorders. (3).

This course provides an in-depth examination of mood disorders (e.g., depression, bipolar disorder, dysthymia) and anxiety disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobia, panic disorders). The course examines the etiology and course of the disorders from multiple perspectives. In addition, the course requires a critical review of psychotherapeutic interventions that have been proven effective from a variety of theoretical and treatment modalities. The most current approaches to assessment are reviewed.

PSYC 753. Gender and Sexual Disorders. (2).

This course will explore gender and sexual disorders from multiple perspectives including historical, object relational, attachment, cognitive, behavioral, systems, biological and social. Diagnostic criteria and etiology will be examined while considering the influence of culture and societal values. Multiple treatment approaches and interventions will be examined as found in relevant research. Students will explore their own sexual attitudes and develop an awareness of and comfort with the complexities of human sexuality.

PSYC 754. Eating Disorders/Substance Abuse/ Somatoform Disorders. (2).

The course examines the major theories addressing somatoform disorders (body dysmorphia, conversion, hypochondriasis, pain disorder and somatization), as well as substance abuse and eating disorders. Students will explore possible overlap between these disorders as understood from a variety of theoretical frameworks (including psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic and social learning theory), as well as findings from neuroscience. The course emphasizes a developmental perspective in the understanding of these issues.

PSYC 755. Schizophrenia and Other Cognitive Disorders. (2).

This course examines major theories on the etiology of schizophrenia and other cognitive disorders and their symptomatic manifestations. The course includes a historical overview of the disorders as well as recent findings from the fields of biology and neuroscience. The course also includes a review of medications and the neural pathways by which pychotropic medications are thought to affect thought disorders.

PSYC 761. Professional Seminar. (2).

The purpose of this course is to assist students in the development of a professional identity. Students will investigate the various roles of clinical psychologists. They will examine practice issues in light of relevant ethical and legal issues. Each student will develop a plan for transitioning from student to professional.

PSYC 762. Test and Measurement. (2).

This course introduces students to test theory and the psychometric properties of tests. Controversies and ethical issues in assessment are explored from both a quantitative and qualitative perspective. Particular attention is given to potential test biases and the potential misuse of testing in clinical psychology.

PSYC 763. Ethics. (2).

This course is designed to explore the advanced legal and ethical issues for professional psychology. Students will examine and discuss complex and controversial legal and ethical issues as they pertain to clinical practice and research. Students will be expected to demonstrate a good working knowledge of many legal and ethical concepts and to demonstrate their ability to offer a critical analysis of the professional literature. Classroom discussion is an essential part of this course and students are expected to come to each meeting prepared to ask questions and debate topics. Several take-home assignments and a final exam will also be used to assess grades.

PSYC 770. Assessment: Cognitive. (3).

This course is designed to provide graduate level students with training in the administration, scoring and interpretation of the current editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-IV), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), and the Woodcock-Johnson Achievement Test (WJ-III). In addition, other measures of cognitive assessment will be reviewed. Issues relating to the appropriate use of intelligence tests, theories of intelligence, ethical test use, testing culturally diverse populations, integration of data and effective report writing will be addressed.

PSYC 771. Assessment: Personality. (3).

This course is designed to provide graduate level students with training in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of personality measures including projective drawings, sentence completion, Thematic Apperception Test (TAT, CAT, RAT), Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2, MMPI-A), Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), California Personality Inventory-R (CPI-R), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). In addition, other measures of personality assessment will be reviewed. Issues relating to the appropriate use of personality measures, theories of personality, ethical test use, testing culturally diverse populations, integration of data and effective report writing will be addressed.

PSYC 780. History and Systems. (3).

The intention in this course is to guide you to understand psychological science through its history, and through the histories of the societies in Europe and North America within which that science has been embedded. Much of psychology's past has found its roots within the social histories of the countries where Western psychology has developed - Germany, France, Great Britain and the United States. This course will take you on a journey into some of the fascinating theories developed by our intellectual forefathers who proved to have a profound influence on later psychological thought, combining those with investigations into the cultural-historical contexts within which these works were written. Often we erroneously assume that what has been written decades or even centuries ago is too old and must be outdated. Yet, as we will see, the great dinosaurs from the old schools of psychology are still able to teach us modern psychologists a great deal.

PSYC 781. Consultation/Supervision. (3).

This course examines the role of psychologists as consultants and as supervisors. Theories of consulting and supervising will be presented, as well as experiential exercises. Students will consider the roles of consultant and supervisor from developmental perspectives.

PSYC 782. Cultural Theory and Research. (3).

This is a course for interested students who want to learn about cultural perspectives in psychology at large, and particularly in the cases of human development within varied cultural contexts. Crucial philosophical, theoretical and methodological research issues that are central for developmentally focused cultural psychology will be covered in this course. This course is tailored toward students with philosophical and interdisciplinary interests, whose goals are to learn more about our basic scientific understanding of human psychology. The course is primarily based on an active learning approach founded on the principles of Accountable Talk, which dictates that all students must be held accountable to their learning community, to accurate and appropriate knowledge, and to rigorous thinking. In other words, this will not be a standard lecture course in which students passively absorb knowledge, rather the course format will take a partnership approach in which students help one another build knowledge (based on the course textbook and instructor guidance), in order to make sense of who we are and the culture in which we live.

PSYC 783. Intimate Partner Violence: Advanced Research, Theory and Technique. (3).

This course will examine the history of intimate partner violence from multiple perspectives including psychological and psychosocial understandings. Current research will be presented and multiple theoretical frameworks will be explored. In addition, the course will review current approaches to treating clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence including evidence-based practices. Cultural understanding and influences will also be studied.

PSYC 784. Intimate Partner Violence: Advanced Clinical Applications. (3).

This course will provide an in-depth examination, analysis and evaluation of current practices utilized in working with clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence. Students will examine research, view video of therapy sessions and present their own work with clients.

PSYC 790. Neuropsychoanalysis. (3).

This course will provide an interface between modern neuroscientific research and psychoanalytic theory and practice. Students will explore the relationships between brain structure and function as they relate to the phenomenological expression of the human condition. They will examine how brain development may underlie both psychosexual and psychosocial maturity and the implications of these changes for psychotherapy. By building from the neuroscience of understanding brain injuries and anomalies, we will consider how psychogenic processes may involve similar biological and anatomical systems. The student will also become versed in the modern scientific epistemologies of complex dynamic systems. These epistemologies will also be integrated with psychoanalytic concepts in consideration of expanding our conventional understanding of depth psychology.

PSYC 791. Psychopharmacology. (2).

This course will examine the principles of psychopharmacology and will review individual classes of drugs as well as their mechanisms. Special attention will be given to drug-to-drug interactions, particularly with the elderly. Students will become familiar with the FDA drug review process and will consider relevant legal and ethical issues.

PSYC 792. Advanced Topics. (3).

PSYC 795. Internship 1. (1).

PSYC 796. Internship 2. (1).